18th Century Conflict Teacher Resources

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Fifth graders examine and critique the art, artists, and artisans of late 18th century America.
Students explore how technology has slowly changed the world, starting in the 18th Century.  In this United States History lesson, students work in teams to complete numerous activities that compare and contrast life before and after technological changes started to occur, such as the invention of the plow, the cotton gin or electricity.
Study the Revolutionary War era practice of recruiting seamen to prey upon the British shipping industry, and discuss the impact this practice had on the Colonial war efforts. Learners read and interpret recruiting advertisements for these positions. What's their response? Would they enlist? 
Rather than simply summarizing the events that led to the American Revolution, have your learners listen as John Green offers some interesting points to be used as discussion or writing prompts in your review of the war. Green details early American colonies as self-governing entities, brings to light some hypocrisies of the War for Independence, and concludes by discussing the influence of the Enlightenment.
Using primary source documents, including maps, learners examine Revolutionary War events from 1775 to 1778. The focus here is on the challenges George Washington and the Continental army faced and how they persevered in spite of those hardships. Four activities--a panel discussion, a whole-class discussion of documents, map work, and a time-line activity provide individuals with the information they need to craft an essay on whether or not Washington lived up to the Continental Congress's expectations.
Students investigate some the ways art has responded to conflict throughout history. Through teacher lecture and demonstration, students witness the historical background of a piece of artwork and how it reflects the conflict it represents. Students create their own piece of artwork to illustrate what September 11, 2001 meant in terms of US history.
Students discover boats by researching 18th century ships.  In this Naval history lesson, students identify and describe the different components of an 18th century naval ship after researching information on the Internet.  Students complete a Naval Ship worksheet and practice using discovery vocabulary terms.
Students recognize the taxation of the American colonists by the British led to the revolution. They participate in or analyze a performance of an 18th-century song and then discuss its meaning and craft.
In this online interactive literature worksheet, students respond to 8 short answer and essay questions about Leo Tolstoy's War and PeaceStudents may check some of their answers online.
In this online interactive reading comprehension activity, students respond to 25 multiple choice questions about Leo Tolstoy's War and PeaceStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
Fifth graders view a slide presentation of Revolutionary period paintings and engravings and list them on a timeline of the American Revolution. They conduct Internet research on various artists. Students apply 18th century art techniques to pencil sketches of available engravings and paintings.
Students researchhow Queen Ann's War of Europe affect Native Americans in New England. After reading excerpts from History of Deerfiel by George Sheldon and Nuthatch's Dilemma, a story about a Pocumtuck woman, students are prepared to complete graphic organizers and/or step back in time to write fictitious letters to Nuthatch.
Students discover daily life on George Washington's plantation, Mount Vernon.  In this compare and contrast lesson, students examine the life styles at four distinct sites at Mount Vernon to become familiar with the people, places, and objects that were part of 18th century life.
This fantastic video discusses the economic foundations and major implications of the Seven Years War in the United States. It begins by covering the roots of the war in the battle between the British and French over trade in the colonies, and then details the shuffling of territories at the conclusion of the war, including British efforts to slow colonial western settlement with the Proclamation of 1763.
Students compare and contrast the changing Native and English colonial architectural landscape of the 17th and 18th centuries. Students research and evaluate how economic technology, and the environment reflected cultural changes in the country, then write about their findings.
Students research the concept of a dungeon during the time of the 18th century. They are looking for its significance and the reason for its construction tied to the lifestyles of people during the time. Students compare and contrast the prison system of the time with modern prisons.
Learners explore nature of cultural movements in Western Civilization since the 18th Century by examining various styles of painting, and analyzing impact of culture on its forms of artistic expression. Students then create imitative paintings of work by selected artist, and created weblets using Claris or Netscape.
Fourth graders describe how the French and Indian War resulted in expansion of United States Territory and analyze information from two or more sources for agreements, contradictions, facts, and opinions.
Students explore U.S. history by participating in a government activity. In this Constitution instructional activity, students identify the role government plays in our society and the differences the British colonies had in the early 18th century. Students read assigned text which describes the historical event and complete worksheets and study questions.
Sixth graders investigate the causes of the American Revolution.  In this causes of the American Revolution lesson, 6th graders make hypotheses, analyze data, and rank the top causes of the war. Students complete a timeline and write a paragraph on the most important cause.