18th Century Conflict Teacher Resources

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Students discover boats by researching 18th century ships.  In this Naval history lesson, students identify and describe the different components of an 18th century naval ship after researching information on the Internet.  Students complete a Naval Ship worksheet and practice using discovery vocabulary terms.
Learners recognize the taxation of the American colonists by the British led to the revolution. They participate in or analyze a performance of an 18th-century song and then discuss its meaning and craft.
Fifth graders examine and critique the art, artists, and artisans of late 18th century America.
Fifth graders view a slide presentation of Revolutionary period paintings and engravings and list them on a timeline of the American Revolution. They conduct Internet research on various artists. Students apply 18th century art techniques to pencil sketches of available engravings and paintings.
Students discover daily life on George Washington's plantation, Mount Vernon.  In this compare and contrast lesson, students examine the life styles at four distinct sites at Mount Vernon to become familiar with the people, places, and objects that were part of 18th century life.
Students compare and contrast the changing Native and English colonial architectural landscape of the 17th and 18th centuries. Students research and evaluate how economic technology, and the environment reflected cultural changes in the country, then write about their findings.
Students research the concept of a dungeon during the time of the 18th century. They are looking for its significance and the reason for its construction tied to the lifestyles of people during the time. Students compare and contrast the prison system of the time with modern prisons.
Young scholars explore nature of cultural movements in Western Civilization since the 18th Century by examining various styles of painting, and analyzing impact of culture on its forms of artistic expression. Students then create imitative paintings of work by selected artist, and created weblets using Claris or Netscape.
Young scholars research how childhood was depicted in art in the 17th through 19th centuries. In groups, they research pieces of art and write a paper explaining how the portrayal of students in art changed at the end of the 18th century.
Study the Revolutionary War era practice of recruiting seamen to prey upon the British shipping industry, and discuss the impact this practice had on the Colonial war efforts. Learners read and interpret recruiting advertisements for these positions. What's their response? Would they enlist? 
Students examine several letters to the editor from both a local newspaper and national newspapers. After reviewing current letters, they write a letter to the editor of an 18th-century newspaper expressing their opinion about the American Revolution. Letters are exchanged with classmates for peer review before turning in a final draft.
Students study the goals set out for the Constitution. They examine the resolutions arrived at to resolve three major conflicts which arose during the writing of the Constitution. They discuss or write down a one-sentence summary of what goals the Preamble sets out for the Constitution.
Students explore the distinct forms of knowledge that enslaved Africans brought with them to America or developed while enslaved. They study how political movements of the 18th century helped develop abolitionist thinking.
Students investigate some the ways art has responded to conflict throughout history. Through teacher lecture and demonstration, students witness the historical background of a piece of artwork and how it reflects the conflict it represents. Students create their own piece of artwork to illustrate what September 11, 2001 meant in terms of US history.
Young scholars examine primary and secondary sources to determine how cultural characteristics, beliefs and attitudes contributed to the growth of inter-group hostilities during the 17th and 18th centuries in the US.
Students investigate the hardships and difficulties that the Continental army faced in the early years of the American War for independence. the battles of Lexington and concord and the expectations of the Continental Army forms the focus of this lesson plan.
In this online interactive literature learning exercise, learners respond to 8 short answer and essay questions about Leo Tolstoy's War and PeaceStudents may check some of their answers online.
Students use primary sources to investigate, explore and represent varying perspectives on the 1704 Deerfield Raid. They consider the reasons Deerfield was at the center of English, French and Native American conflicts in the early 18th century.
In this online interactive reading comprehension instructional activity, students respond to 25 multiple choice questions about Leo Tolstoy's War and PeaceStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
Young scholars explore the frontier wars of the 1790s. After researching one battle, teams of students prepare a presentation for the class. Young scholars compare and contrast the Columbian Tragedy with "broadsides" that were printed to announce events. Finally, students create a "broadside" to announce the researched battle.