18th Century Conflict Teacher Resources

Find 18th Century Conflict educational ideas and activities

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Ninth graders analyze the English model if imperialism with regard to China and examine the economic and political impact of trade and conflict between England and China in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. They discuss the impact that opium had both in China and England during the trading time periods.
Students researchhow Queen Ann's War of Europe affect Native Americans in New England. After reading excerpts from History of Deerfiel by George Sheldon and Nuthatch's Dilemma, a story about a Pocumtuck woman, students are prepared to complete graphic organizers and/or step back in time to write fictitious letters to Nuthatch.
Students explore life as early settlers in Frederica by pretending to be crafts/tradesmen there and writing letters describing the fort/town to a friend or family member still in Great Britain, debating reconstruction vs. preservation, and discussing plan
Students gather a general understanding of terms related to international rules of warfare and human rights, then discuss hypothetical applications of those rules. They write letters expressing their opinion on the current application of these rules.
Students explore how technology has slowly changed the world, starting in the 18th Century.  In this United States History instructional activity, students work in teams to complete numerous activities that compare and contrast life before and after technological changes started to occur, such as the invention of the plow, the cotton gin or electricity.
Students list qualities they believe made George Washington an effective military leader. They discuss some difficulties Washington faced as Commander-in-Chief and describe his response to the Newburgh Conspiracy.
In this math information worksheet, learners read one page factual accounts of the early math inventions of the abacus, the calculator and early computers. There are 40 questions to answer about the reading.
Students examine life in Babylonia during the time of King Hammurabi. They read and discuss excerpts of the Code of Hammurabi, participate in a simulation of advisors to the king, complete an online interactive activity, answer discussion questions, and write a five-paragraph essay.
Fourth graders describe how the French and Indian War resulted in expansion of United States Territory and analyze information from two or more sources for agreements, contradictions, facts, and opinions.
Young scholars analyze the different roles assumed by various Native American tribes during the American Revolution. They examine the issues involved for Native Americans in choosing the British or the American side of the conflict, such as maintaining trade or preserving homelands. They complete several online activity worksheets after reading some of the information about the Indian's involvement in the American Revolution.
Fifth graders closely examine the effects of slavery on American society giving special emphasis to the issue of social injustice, the life of Harriet Tubman, the underground railroad and the achievements of Abraham Lincoln during this month long unit. Students conduct research, write fictional accounts of historical events, recreate an underground railroad at their school and participate in role playing activities.
Young scholars research George Washington's stance on slavery. In this slavery instructional activity, students examine primary documents that reveal the relationship between Washington and his slaves at Mount Vernon.
Students explore the concept of myths conveyed through art. In this art history lesson, students examine "Three Goddesses" and discuss the state of the world at the time that Nollekens created the sculptures as they analyze the pieces.
Students attempt to decipher a 17th century New England land deed to determine ownership of land. They explore how English settler's confusion over land ownership lead to conflict with the Pocumtuck Indian tribe.
Students study the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the inventions of Thomas Alva Edison. They design an infomercial to sell a product or a service for an invention. They create an invention that improves the world and write an article or news release.
Students discover details about the slave community at Mt. Vernon. In this George Washington lesson, students examine Washington's 1799 Slave Census in order to determine what life was like for slaves of the first president. An analysis sheet is included.
In this online interactive psychology worksheet, students respond to 24 multiple choice questions about Foucault's The History of Sexuality: An Introduction. Students submit their answers to be scored.
Young scholars examine how portraits can tell us more about people of the past than just what they looked like. They compare three portraits of U.S. Presidents, analyze portraits of Americans from the Revolutionary War, and write a report on family portraits.
Sixth graders investigate the causes of the American Revolution.  In this causes of the American Revolution lesson, 6th graders make hypotheses, analyze data, and rank the top causes of the war. Students complete a timeline and write a paragraph on the most important cause.
Learners take a closer look at historical maps. In this American Revolution lesson, students examine the provided historical maps and documents to determine the assignments that George Washington assigned to subordinates during the Revolutionary War.