18th Century England Teacher Resources

Find 18th Century England educational ideas and activities

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Fifth graders investigate what a covenant was and how they relate to contemporary government ideals. In this comparing covenant lesson plan, 5th graders examine primary source documents that are examples of covenants from 18th century New England. They read and make concept webs of the covenants before writing an original covenant.
Students explore how technology has slowly changed the world, starting in the 18th Century.  In this United States History lesson, students work in teams to complete numerous activities that compare and contrast life before and after technological changes started to occur, such as the invention of the plow, the cotton gin or electricity.
Students investigate colonial artisans. In this history lesson, students create a booklet of American Artisans and dress up in 18th century clothing for an oral presentation.
Learners examine the time in which the Puritans lived in colonial New England. In groups, they research the Puritans view on life and death and discuss as a class. They read gravestones, diaries and other primary sources to discover more about their daily life. To end the instructional activity, they research the way contangious diseases made their way into New England and the effect on the population of the Puritans.
Students discover the purpose of the sacred cod carving in New England.  In this New England history lesson, students read the story A Cod's Tale, and analyze photographs of Cod including their uses and size.  Students utilize the Internet to further research the financial opportunities New England fisherman gained from harvesting a plentiful cod population. 
Young scholars recognize the taxation of the American colonists by the British led to the revolution. They participate in or analyze a performance of an 18th-century song and then discuss its meaning and craft.
Students observe and compare 18th century British portraits with those made by John Singleton Copley. By conducting research they explore the cultural climate of the portraits in order to write a historically accurate story.
Students research prevailing attitudes and Rousseau's position on child rearing in the 18th century. They consider attitudes toward motherhood and childcare in our own culture through interviews with peers and family members.
Students discover daily life on George Washington's plantation, Mount Vernon.  In this compare and contrast lesson, students examine the life styles at four distinct sites at Mount Vernon to become familiar with the people, places, and objects that were part of 18th century life.
Students compare and contrast the changing Native and English colonial architectural landscape of the 17th and 18th centuries. Students research and evaluate how economic technology, and the environment reflected cultural changes in the country, then write about their findings.
Students discuss the role of music and dance in 18th century Virginia. They take part in the performance of an 18th century dance, and compare dance as a part of the culture in colonial times and as a part of today's culture.
Students explore U.S. history by participating in a government activity. In this Constitution lesson plan, students identify the role government plays in our society and the differences the British colonies had in the early 18th century. Students read assigned text which describes the historical event and complete worksheets and study questions.
Learners examine several letters to the editor from both a local newspaper and national newspapers. After reviewing current letters, they write a letter to the editor of an 18th-century newspaper expressing their opinion about the American Revolution. Letters are exchanged with classmates for peer review before turning in a final draft.
Students research the impact of European voyages of discovery and colonial influence on different aspects of American culture. They access a number of online sources and reference maps to trace the influences of England, France, Holland, Spain, Russia (among others) on the United States.
Learners compare and contrast the various types of architecture in the Southern colonies. Using slides, they discuss how the homes were made and the materials used. In groups, they identify how the types of homes reflected the lifestyles of the colonists living in the Southern colonies.
Pupils research how childhood was depicted in art in the 17th through 19th centuries. In groups, they research pieces of art and write a paper explaining how the portrayal of students in art changed at the end of the 18th century.
While cities had only a small fraction of the population in colonial America, they played a significant role in pre-revolutionary years, and this was certainly true for the largest city in the North American colonies: Philadelphia. Your learners will begin by considering how a city is like an organism, adding to T-charts that list what the main intakes, internal processes, and outputs of a city are and how they are performed. They will then familiarize themselves with the main elements of a city map and "take a walk" through eighteenth century Philadelphia, reading a narrative filled with sensory imagery and valuable historical information.
Students identify the major geographic features of colonial New England. They explain the essential parts to a map and interpret journals to plot a journey. They discover the connection between geography and life.
This presentation reviews the ins and outs of nineteenth century imperialism. The narrator discusses the colonization of Africa in great detail, and delves into the effects of industrialization, superior technology, and widespread disease on the imperialistic motivations of European powers.
Students examine primary and secondary sources to determine how cultural characteristics, beliefs and attitudes contributed to the growth of inter-group hostilities during the 17th and 18th centuries in the US.