18th Century Events Teacher Resources

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Students discuss colonial gardening in the 18th century, and collect data using research materials. They create a simple garden design with appropriately titled and labeled data.
Fifth graders examine and research the art of chip carving in 18th century America. They create rosette designs using radial symmetry with rulers and compasses.
Fifth graders examine and critique the art, artists, and artisans of late 18th century America.
Students compare and contrast travel in the 18th century with current methods of travel by participating in a simulated trip to Mount Vernon. In this US history activity, students write a letter to George Washington for permission to visit Mount Vernon. Students create a trip itinerary and research travel in the 18th century. Students complete journal entries to record what travel would have been like on their trip. Students write a thank you letter to the Washington's.
Students examine primary documents to determine whether or not George Washington was an honest leader. In this presidential history lesson, students evaluate Washington's leadership prior to and during his presidency. Guided reading activities are included with this lesson.
Students discuss forms of transportation in Delaware during 18th Century, find approximate area of court order on current map of state, draw layout of their school, and decide where new hallway or outside pathway would be most needed.
Learners identify and discuss characteristics of runaway slaves in 18th Century, read A Narrative of the Adventures and Escapes of Moses, select five advertisements for Virginia Runaways Digital Project to complete On the Run worksheet, and construct plan for escaping captivity.
Students explore how technology has slowly changed the world, starting in the 18th Century.  In this United States History lesson plan, students work in teams to complete numerous activities that compare and contrast life before and after technological changes started to occur, such as the invention of the plow, the cotton gin or electricity.
Fifth graders investigate what a covenant was and how they relate to contemporary government ideals. In this comparing covenant lesson, 5th graders examine primary source documents that are examples of covenants from 18th century New England. They read and make concept webs of the covenants before writing an original covenant.
Learners investigate colonial artisans. In this history lesson, students create a booklet of American Artisans and dress up in 18th century clothing for an oral presentation.
Students discover boats by researching 18th century ships.  In this Naval history activity, students identify and describe the different components of an 18th century naval ship after researching information on the Internet.  Students complete a Naval Ship worksheet and practice using discovery vocabulary terms.
In this online interactive psychology worksheet, students respond to 24 multiple choice questions about Foucault's The History of Sexuality: An Introduction. Students submit their answers to be scored.
Rather than simply summarizing the events that led to the American Revolution, have your learners listen as John Green offers some interesting points to be used as discussion or writing prompts in your review of the war. Green details early American colonies as self-governing entities, brings to light some hypocrisies of the War for Independence, and concludes by discussing the influence of the Enlightenment.
Students compare and contrast the changing Native and English colonial architectural landscape of the 17th and 18th centuries. Students research and evaluate how economic technology, and the environment reflected cultural changes in the country, then write about their findings.
Students investigate historic furniture.  In this art history lesson, students compare and contrast two chairs from different periods.  Students create a collage from images of the past.
Students compare and contrast life in 18th and 21st century America. In this American history lesson, students view the video, "Ben Franklin and Philadelphia." Students then complete a comparison chart featuring the similarities and differences of the 18th and 21st centuries.
This presentation reviews the ins and outs of nineteenth century imperialism. The narrator discusses the colonization of Africa in great detail, and delves into the effects of industrialization, superior technology, and widespread disease on the imperialistic motivations of European powers.
Students observe and compare 18th century British portraits with those made by John Singleton Copley. By conducting research they explore the cultural climate of the portraits in order to write a historically accurate story.
"Is capitalism competition natural and good, or should there be systems in place to check it for the sake of our collective well-being?" Explore the complexity and history behind capitalism and socialism in Crash Course World History #33. Though he presents information quickly, Green also extensively dissects these broad economic concepts, highlighting key personalities in their development, terms such as industrial and mercantilism capitalism, as well as class struggle and communism. Tip: Have learners watch the videos once with one central question in mind, and then re-watch the video stopping at various points for class to take notes and discuss concepts.
Students evaluate leadership traits in 18th century Hawai'i and modern times. In this leadership skills lesson plan, students identify leadership traits and read the story of Ka’iana. Students monitor the leadership activities of a partner and research another leader to compare with Ka’iana.