18th Century Events Teacher Resources

Find 18th Century Events educational ideas and activities

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Students explore the distinct forms of knowledge that enslaved Africans brought with them to America or developed while enslaved. They study how political movements of the 18th century helped develop abolitionist thinking.
Students create a presentation on one of seven diseases common to sea going ships.  In this diseases on ships lesson plan, students research diseases commonly found on ships of the late 16th and early 18th centuries.  Students read From Slave Ship to Freedom Road and choose a disease to present in a commercial, play, paper, picture book, poster, or other project.
In this math information worksheet, learners read one page factual accounts of the early math inventions of the abacus, the calculator and early computers. There are 40 questions to answer about the reading.
Sixth graders research the history of Pompeii and its destruction. Locate important geographical features of Rome. Gain insight into the past through archaeological interpretation. Synthesize historical information through imaginative writing.
While cities had only a small fraction of the population in colonial America, they played a significant role in pre-revolutionary years, and this was certainly true for the largest city in the North American colonies: Philadelphia. Your learners will begin by considering how a city is like an organism, adding to T-charts that list what the main intakes, internal processes, and outputs of a city are and how they are performed. They will then familiarize themselves with the main elements of a city map and "take a walk" through eighteenth century Philadelphia, reading a narrative filled with sensory imagery and valuable historical information.
Students examine the history of the National parks. In groups, they discuss the concepts of conservation and preservation. They discuss the use of natural resources and how some are renewable and non-renewable. To end the lesson, they research the role of Gifford Pinchot and the Hetch Hetchy controversy and discuss with the class.
Young scholars examine primary and secondary sources to determine how cultural characteristics, beliefs and attitudes contributed to the growth of inter-group hostilities during the 17th and 18th centuries in the US.
Students understand the importance of evaluating the information from websites. In this Early American History lesson, students appreciate artifacts of early American Life and record information about them. Students then research more fully the artifact. Students share information and conclusions.
Think of a few of the great explorers in world history...are you thinking of any women? Chances are, probably not, and this will most likely be the case for many of your class members. But in many ways, female explorers may exemplify greater strength and passion than most explorers we commonly think of, as they challenged incredible social criticism and restrictions in order to pursue their adventurous spirit. Learn more about three women in particular--Marianne North, Mary Kingsley and Alexandra David-Neél--and how as a result of privilege, endurance, and not taking "no" for an answer, they made incredible contributions to the scientific and artistic community.
Discover the kabuki form of Japanese classical theater performance and its reflection of the historical evolution of Japanese government and culture. As the first dramatic performance form catering to the common people, kabuki is shaped by the basic tenets of Confucian philosophy and would later have a great effect on such artists as Van Gogh and Debussy.
In this global history and geography standardized test practice worksheet, young scholars respond to 50 multiple choice, 1 essay, and 15 short answer questions that require them to review their knowledge of world history and geography.
In this global history and geography standardized test practice worksheet, young scholars respond to 50 multiple choice, 1 essay, and 15 short answer questions that require them to review their knowledge of world history and geography.
For this global history and geography standardized test practice worksheet, students respond to 50 multiple choice, 1 essay, and 15 short answer questions that require them to review their knowledge of world history and geography.
Pupils research and record the people, events, and locations important to each of two developments and accurately place them on a timeline representing 1400-1800. In this database lesson plan, students write three well-developed paragraphs describing the two events and record information necessary for providing correct citations in MLA style.
Learners explore the history of chocolate and its consumption. In this chocolate history lesson, students discover how industrialization changed the way humans consume chocolate. Learners use the provided worksheet to note details they learn about chocolate consumption through the centuries. 
In this SoHo House learning journey worksheet, students read a short history of the So Ho house and the prominent workman associated with it. They read about James Watt, William Murdoch, and Matthew Boulton.
Learners engage in a long term unit concerning world theatre history. They use guided questions in order to conduct research to cover the history of theatre in different time periods. During the class the teacher lectures and the students take notes to add to internet research.
The kite has an amazing history! It has been used for thousands of years, has led to many scientific disoveries, and has made some people very famous. Just ask Ben Franklin! This terrific lesson offers many cross-curricular activities that all have to do with the kite. There are worksheets, and terrific resource links embedded in the plan as well. This activities in this plan are sure to be a hit with your students!
Wow, now here's a presentation that tells a story! Your class can follow along the battle lines of the American Revolution to learn key players, dates, and events that marked each twist and turn in the fight for American independence. Start with the Battle for Boston, British military strategy, and Bunker Hill, then progress to people like General Cornwallis, William Howe, and Georg Washington.
What was it like to live as an indentured servant or an apprentice in colonial Carolina? As part of a series of lessons focusing on the history of North Carolina, class members use a digital history textbook to examine primary and secondary sources about these forms of labor. Individuals then craft two letters; one from the point of view of an indentured teen, and one as an apprenticed teen. Writers describe their lives to their parents back in England.