18th Century Events Teacher Resources

Find 18th Century Events educational ideas and activities

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Students examine life in Babylonia during the time of King Hammurabi. They read and discuss excerpts of the Code of Hammurabi, participate in a simulation of advisors to the king, complete an online interactive activity, answer discussion questions, and write a five-paragraph essay.
Students identify periods of history and read a news article about a librarian who wrote an award winning book. In this current events lesson, the teacher introduces the article with a class challenge and a vocabulary activity, then students read the news report and participate in a think-pair-share discussion. Lesson includes interdisciplinary follow-up activities.
Students research examples of different types of sailing ships, investigating the vessels as well as the politics, economy, and people at the historical time and place the boat was launched. They create displays for a museum exhibit about sailing ships.
Is there anything better than chocolate? This series of cross-curricular lessons lays out five to seven days of a study on chocolate. Over these days, learners watch video clips about how chocolate is made, compose poems and legends, complete a map and timeline of the history of chocolate, and interact directly with chocolate. Complete with short informational texts, options for evaluation, and extensions, this unit could be used as is or altered to suit your classroom needs.
Students participate in different activities examining Benjamin Franklin and his activities. They work together in groups and as a class to research his inventions and his self-improvement plans.
This units gives students opportunities to * Research the history and patterns of French settlement in Louisiana * Discover three types of music (New Orleans jazz, Cajun, Zydeco) which are representative of the Francophone presence in Louisiana. * Make connections between the rhythms of the music and those of the French language.
Seventh graders listen to a variety of folktales sharing experiences of slavery. As a class, they compare and contrast reading a story and telling a story. They participate in a role play activity to discover the journey of a slave and reflect on the activity in their journal. After watching a video, they discuss how point of view influences ones view of history.
The origins of the state of Arkansas are the focus of this history instructional activity. Elementary schoolers to high schoolers identify persons associated with the development of the state from the very first European contact to statehood in 1836. Besides outlining some great activities, this instructional activity has short biographies of many of the major players in the development of Arkansas.
Learners explore local history and relate to National Events.  In this primary documents lesson,students explore eyewitness accounts of events at special moments in American history.  Learners recognize symbols of our country. Students explore the slave trade and answer guided questions.
Young scholars examine how the European voyages of discovery influence American culture even today. They map eighteenth century Europe's impact on the United States.
Students investigate some the ways art has responded to conflict throughout history. Through teacher lecture and demonstration, students witness the historical background of a piece of artwork and how it reflects the conflict it represents. Students create their own piece of artwork to illustrate what September 11, 2001 meant in terms of US history.
Students research the impact of European voyages of discovery and colonial influence on different aspects of American culture. They access a number of online sources and reference maps to trace the influences of England, France, Holland, Spain, Russia (among others) on the United States.
Students compare anti-immigration movements in United States history. In this immigration lesson plan, students participate in classroom activities that require them to analyze music, images, and videos that reveal the immigration debates of the 18th and 20th centuries.    
Students study the goals set out for the Constitution. They examine the resolutions arrived at to resolve three major conflicts which arose during the writing of the Constitution. They discuss or write down a one-sentence summary of what goals the Preamble sets out for the Constitution.
Eleventh graders trace the history of intolerance in American history and familiarize themselves with the actions of the United States towards the Holocaust. They explore present day Holocaust denial and Neo-Nazism in the United States.
Students study the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the inventions of Thomas Alva Edison. They design an infomercial to sell a product or a service for an invention. They create an invention that improves the world and write an article or news release.
Students create a project poster displaying photos, drawings, and journal writings that incorporate the major themes of California's missions, and use perspective and point of view both visually and in writing.
Seventh graders study the ideologies of life, values, love, peace and struggle of African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans as citizens of the United States. Authors and artists are used as tools to open the eyes of the students and allow them to see the impact and significance of cultures upon the history of the United States. Through traditional stories from different groups, they explore the customs and beliefs of their culture and others.
Learners describe and identify the types of maritime activity between 1680 and 1806. For this maritime history lesson, students explore the "On the Water" exhibit online and describe the people involved. Learners choose 3-5 maritime activities which affect their lives or the community and take digital photos of them. Students present their photos to the class.
Have your class explore U.S. history by discussing religion in the colonial era. Your fifth graders review the history of Pennsylvania and the conformist views placed upon immigrants to the country. Then, they read a letter Benjamin Franklin wrote regarding the influx of German immigrants to the U.S. during the 1700's. This is a great way to promote critical-thinking skills.