18th Century Science Teacher Resources

Find 18th Century Science educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 271 resources
Students discuss colonial gardening in the 18th century, and collect data using research materials. They create a simple garden design with appropriately titled and labeled data.
Fifth graders examine and critique the art, artists, and artisans of late 18th century America.
Learners investigate colonial artisans. For this history lesson, students create a booklet of American Artisans and dress up in 18th century clothing for an oral presentation.
Students examine the style of an 18th-century compound microscope and its case. In this scientific design activity, students look at Jacques Caffieri's, "Compound Microscope and Case" before comparing the design to a modern microscope. They design their own scientific or technological instrument using pencils, colored pencils, and drawing paper.
Students discover boats by researching 18th century ships.  In this Naval history lesson, students identify and describe the different components of an 18th century naval ship after researching information on the Internet.  Students complete a Naval Ship worksheet and practice using discovery vocabulary terms.
Students become familiar with the black-figure painting style of ancient Greece and its influence on Neoclassical artists during the 18th century, as seen in drawing, painting, and silhouettes, or shadow portraits.
Young scholars recognize the taxation of the American colonists by the British led to the revolution. They participate in or analyze a performance of an 18th-century song and then discuss its meaning and craft.
Students research prevailing attitudes and Rousseau's position on child rearing in the 18th century. They consider attitudes toward motherhood and childcare in our own culture through interviews with peers and family members.
Fifth graders view a slide presentation of Revolutionary period paintings and engravings and list them on a timeline of the American Revolution. They conduct Internet research on various artists. Students apply 18th century art techniques to pencil sketches of available engravings and paintings.
Pupils explore life on an 18th century southern plantation/farm as it is related not only to raising crops, but also to preparing food, making clothing, caring for animals, making soap, blacksmithing, etc. They create a timeline of scientific discoveries, inventions, and technologies from 1730 to 1802 that are related to life on a plantation/farm
Students explore several concepts involved in organic farming and agriculture. In this environmental science instructional activity, students assess the pros and cons of organic farming. They explain the benefits of composting and pest management.
Middle schoolers examine several letters to the editor from both a local newspaper and national newspapers. After reviewing current letters, they write a letter to the editor of an 18th-century newspaper expressing their opinion about the American Revolution. Letters are exchanged with classmates for peer review before turning in a final draft.
Second graders view a website to become familiar with Bethabara, a Moravian settlement.  In this Moravian migration lesson, 2nd graders find similarities and differences to the community of the Moravians in the 18th century.  Students create a visual presentation based on pictures of the Moravian community.
In this math information instructional activity, students read one page factual accounts of the early math inventions of the abacus, the calculator and early computers. There are 40 questions to answer about the reading.
Ninth graders research the work of Carlos J. Finlay and his contributions to science. Once they have discussed his theories about diseases, they create tables comparing diseases that use insects as carriers. The lesson also includes a worksheet requiring short answers.
Students explore the scientific career of Benjamin Franklin. In this science instructional activity, students discuss Franklin's correspondence with other scientists and write letters describing Benjamin Franklin's experiments.
Young scholars discuss and analyze the style and function of an 18th-century compound microscope and compare the design to the design of modern scientific devices. They design their own modern scientific or technological instrument.
Fifth graders carefully analyze the artwork, Les Emigrants, and explore the reasons that people emigrated to the United States, and what life was like for new arrivals. They discuss what things immigrants were able to bring with them and what they had to leave behind. Students write a newspaper article on life as an immigrant during the time period portrayed.
Not really just a lesson plan, but a series of activities, reading handouts, and teacher's guidelines for conducting a class mini unit on the battery. Physical scientists focus on the history of the cell battery, experiment with battery-powered circuits, and examine the benefits of using rechargeable versions such as the nickel-cadmium cell. This is a comprehensive package that you will appreciate having available for your upper-elementary and middle school science classes.
Study the Revolutionary War era practice of recruiting seamen to prey upon the British shipping industry, and discuss the impact this practice had on the Colonial war efforts. Learners read and interpret recruiting advertisements for these positions. What's their response? Would they enlist?