20th Century France Teacher Resources

Find 20th Century France educational ideas and activities

Showing 61 - 80 of 309 resources
Listen and analyze as the narrator explains why he identifies World War I as "the war to change all wars". In summarizing the events of the Great War, this episode also details the particular experiences, fears, and motivations of soldiers, the concept of the war as a writers' war, and its major effects on other nations, particularly in the Russian Revolution, emergence of United States as a creditor nation, and the end of the Ottoman Empire.
This presentation's narrator follows the process of decolonization across nations throughout Afro-Eurasia. First highlighting Gandhi's efforts for independence in British-ruled India, learners are then quickly taken through a series of examples of decolonization, such as in Egypt, Indonesia, the Congo.
In this Cold War worksheet, students read 3 brief selections about the conflict and then respond to 13 short answer and multiple choice questions based on the selections.
Fifth graders carefully analyze the artwork, Les Emigrants, and explore the reasons that people emigrated to the United States, and what life was like for new arrivals. They discuss what things immigrants were able to bring with them and what they had to leave behind. Students write a newspaper article on life as an immigrant during the time period portrayed.
What fabrics are our clothes made of? Where do those fabrics from? Lead your pupils to discover the answers to these questions and more. Class members have a chance to play with various fabrics, invesitgating the materials and labels along the way. Ideas for language arts, social studies, science, and math are included as are several worksheets. There could be more detailed procedures that show just how each activity meets the abundance of standards listed on this plan.
A lot happened to European economics, policy, and social systems after WWII. This 24 page social studies packet provides images, reading passages, comprehension questions, and critical thinking questions regarding all things Europe from  1945-1980. Extensive, complete, and well worth your time. 
Young scholars complete a variety of activities as they examine the historical significance of the Transcontinental Railroad and the Golden Spike Ceremony in Promontory, Utah, which honored its completion. In one activity they plan and recreate a grander, more appropriate Golden Spike ceremony.
Learners research and discuss the consequences of the Sedition Act. They illustrate the difficulty of balancing security needs and personal freedom using an example from John Adams's presidency.
You and your high school class can examine the idea of artistic movements with this lesson. Explore various websites, compare/contrast paintings, after which the assignments are to complete a chart, and write an essay.
Ninth graders investigate why Acadians moved to Lousiana.  In this geography lesson, 9th graders research the migration of Acadian to Louisiana and how that influenced the culture.  Students analyze a list of cultural and physical characteristics of Canada and find those present in Louisiana. Students create a map showing migration patterns. Students write a paragraph about the importance of ethnic identity.
Students react to statements about the 2006 Winter Olympics, then read a news article about the Olympic torch's journey through Italy. In this current events instructional activity (written prior to the 2006 Winter Olympics), the teacher introduces the article with a discussion and vocabulary activity, then students read the news report and participate in a class discussion. Lesson includes interdisciplinary follow-up activities.
Here is a terrific lesson about the materials used to make everyday clothing items. Learners are divided up into groups, and each group is assigned an article of clothing to study. They must use the garment label to determine what the article of clothing is made from. They gather information about the materials used and make up a report, which is given to the class. This fine lesson has many terrific worksheets and an assessment embedded in it. A good learning experience for sure!
Students investigate some the ways art has responded to conflict throughout history. Through teacher lecture and demonstration, students witness the historical background of a piece of artwork and how it reflects the conflict it represents. Students create their own piece of artwork to illustrate what September 11, 2001 meant in terms of US history.
Students develop an elementary understanding of the history of art. They study the basic elements of a painting including perspective, composition, color, light and symbolism. They look at each selected painting and analyze it, moving from first impressions to a more detailed examination. to
Students study the effects of colonialism on Africa. In this world history lesson plan, students identify and locate the colonial powers within Africa as well as the make-up of Africa today as they read and analyze writings/readings from multiple perspectives. Students analyze the reasons for the colonial break-up in Africa and identify stereotypes of Africa and work to dispel these myths/stereotypes.
Fifth graders examine primary sources to explore the events leading to World War II. For this World War II lesson, 5th graders  develop questions and research answers from information found in primary documents. Students view a video clip and complete a worksheet related to World War II events.
Students plan a museum visit to study Impressionist paintings and its artists.  In this Impressionism lesson, students examine the colors and perception of space in Impressionist artwork.  Students recognize the characteristic elements of Impressionist paintings.
This units gives high schoolers opportunities to * Research the history and patterns of French settlement in Louisiana * Discover three types of music (New Orleans jazz, Cajun, Zydeco) which are representative of the Francophone presence in Louisiana. * Make connections between the rhythms of the music and those of the French language.
The origins of the state of Arkansas are the focus of this history lesson. Elementary schoolers to high schoolers identify persons associated with the development of the state from the very first European contact to statehood in 1836. Besides outlining some great activities, this lesson has short biographies of many of the major players in the development of Arkansas.
Students study how the geographical location of the New Haven Harbor has affected the lives of the people living in New Haven by focusing our attention on the phenomena of nature which has been prevailing for millions of years in this series of lessons.