Africa 19th Century Teacher Resources

Find Africa 19th Century educational ideas and activities

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Young scholars participate in a series of activities to explore the lives of slaves in 19th century America. They examine the design of slave ships, the hardships endured, and the ways that owners depended on slaves for their economic survival.
Students evaluate the different types of historical and geographical information that one can gather through close study of historical maps from the 16th through the 19th centuries. They create their own maps.
Students examine reasons for immigration to the United States in the 19th century. They role play as immigrants asked to write accounts of their immigrant experiences.
Seventh graders complete a unit of lessons on the reform movements of the mid-1800's in the U.S. They participate in an Internet scavenger hunt, analyze primary source documents, and develop and perform a simulation of a mid-19th century reform rally.
Students explore the factors that contributed to the decline of Timbuktu and the myths and misconceptions about the city. Students study the obstacles that made a journey to Timbuktu a difficult one as well as discover the first European to make the journey to Timbuktu in the 19th century.
Students observe, discuss, and interpret Radcliffe Bailey's work "By the River" by creating a personal narrative of the 18th or 19th century. Internet access is required and related links are offered for teaching aides.
Prepare yourself for a top-notch presentation on colonialism in Africa! Discussed are the reasons for African multilingualism. Maps and a country-by-country look at various colonists that made their mark on the African continent are explored. A case study and look at the effects of colonialism are covered in sociolinguistic terms. Remember that language houses culture and the shifts seen therein.
Students explore Africa. In this global studies lesson, students research the history of African nations, noting the impact of European colonization and other historical events. Students design posters about the nations they research.
Students study the complex relationships between art, artists, and the political establishment in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this art and history lesson, students study various photos, paintings, and sculptures and learn about the ideals they represented.
Students study the effects of colonialism on Africa. In this world history lesson plan, students identify and locate the colonial powers within Africa as well as the make-up of Africa today as they read and analyze writings/readings from multiple perspectives. Students analyze the reasons for the colonial break-up in Africa and identify stereotypes of Africa and work to dispel these myths/stereotypes.
Fourth graders explore the reign of Queen Victoria and the significant political developments in the 19th century.
Highlight some of the major players and progressive inventions that shaped the latter half of the 19th century. From Thomas Edison to Vaudeville, this outline of pop and tech culture provides an American cultural context. Note: Use this presentation for comparing American culture to other cultures.
Afrikaans, a language derived from Dutch, is spoken by almost 10 million people! Introduce your scholars to South Africa, discuss the evolution of Afrikaans, and look at Apartheid.
What is a mother's role in American society? According to an article in a 1845 newspaper, to the mother falls the job of daily, hourly "weeding her little garden--of eradicating these odious productions (like vice, fraud, idleness) and planting the human with the lily, the rose, and the amaranth, that fadeless flower, emblem of truth." Middle schoolers examine this and other primary source documents that detail expectations of mothers during the time period. Groups then compare these descriptions to the role as it is perceived today. The richly detailed packet includes numerous activities, links to resources, and discussion questions.
The phrase, "You sold out" has been thrown around among musicians that have lent their talents to the corporate world. Here, the class engages in an interesting discussion on how musicians make a living and the influence of commercialism and marketing in today's society. They then research how musicians lived in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and come back to discuss how the music business has changed.
Students locate on a map the places in Africa where the majority of slaves came from. They express their own personal thoughts and feelings about slavery.
Learners interpret and analyze primary source documents and compare and contrast childhood today with that of the past.
This activity is intended to follow-up or reinforce concepts learned relating to the Great Depression, antebellum period, and the turn of the twentieth century. Learners conduct research and read about North Carolina during one of the mentioned periods, paying particular attention to how people spoke during those eras. They transcribe a passage using each targeted dialect.
Students examine the geography, politics and history of their local town of New Haven, Connecticut. Using the internet, they explore the neighbors of New Haven and write directions from their house to school. In groups, they research recent information about the city from the cities website and share what they have gathered. To end the lesson, they build a model of the city and its physical characteristics.
Students trace the history of the development of Eugenics. In this social studies lesson, students read and analyze a real life case. They write a paper about what they read.