African-American History Teacher Resources

Find African American History educational ideas and activities

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Groups of high school learners conduct research on a particular era of African-American history, focusing on events, people, and places important to that era. Next, they review children's literature in four different genres. As a culminating activity, group members combine what they have learned in their research and readings to create their own piece of children's literature based on African-American history.
Students research the role played and contributions made by African American soldiers during World War I. They discuss the evolution of civil rights in America's history, and the progress that has been made in the last 100 years.
Examine the contributions of African-Americans in the worlds of art and literature. Over the course of a few days, young scholars will read and analyze a poem, a short story, and a piece of art. They complete a range of comprehension-building activities, including writing poetry based on their reflections, comparing different people groups through a graph, and creating a class mural.
African-American history is an integral part of what America is. Learners examine important events, read informational texts, and create quilts depicting specific eras in African-American history. Each image created for the quilt will be followed by a written explanation of its significance. This is a great lesson plan, it is appropriate for any time of the year.
Determine how African-Americans have broken barriers in this history lesson. Middle schoolers discuss the 15th Amendment and the American civil rights movement prior to analyzing Barack Obama's speech "A More Perfect Union," taking care to evaluate the speaker's argument. Then they compose essays of their own regarding social change.
The feelings and attitudes of African-Americans during World War II are examined by high schoolers. After watching various clips from "The War," they answer comprehension questions for each section. In groups, they create their own Double V campaign to promote equal rights. They end the lesson by comparing the African-American experience to other minorities during the war.
Students describe issues or problems facing African Americans following Reconstruction. They explain possible solutions to these problems suggested in the sources you find, and cite arguments for and against these solutions.
Students read stories by women authors on the characteristics of the African-American family. Using the internet, they research the history of issues that have affected African-American families from the Civil War to the Civil Rights movement. They read and write about various authors and issues surrounding the African-American families to end the instructional activity.
Students use puppets and plays to examine the role of African Americans throughout history. After being read a story by a puppet, they respond to each one in writing. Individually, they write a story about a place they have wanted to visit along with their feelings. To end the lesson plan, they make their own doll based on a character in a book and share it with the class.
Students write a rap or hip-hop lyric about the life of a famous Black American. They explore famous Black Americans in history and explore how the rap form compares to other forms of poetic expression.
Middle schoolers read about the life and work of John and Mary Jones. Using primary source documents, they draw conclusions about their role in the abolistionist movement. They also examine artifacts from their lives and analyze their portrait in groups to determine what they can gather from it.
Students examine the archaeological site of Lick Creek, Indiana. They discover the settlement of African-American settlers. They practice using new vocabulary as well.
Learners study the key figures in African-American military history. They discover how African-American military history reflect both discrimination and the often heroic struggle to overcome discrimination. They examine the key periods of progress in African-American military history.
Students research the careers of African-American scientists and inventors. They uses both Internet and print resourses for their research. They design a slideshow presentation on five of these significant individuals.
This is a fantastic resource designed for learners to envision what it was like for the three million African-Americans who migrated to urban industrial centers of the northern United States between 1910 and 1940. After reading a fictional interview detailing one family's unique experience of uprooting themselves for a better life, class members brainstorm what type of questions might have been asked in the interview. Then, after reading and learning more about the migrants' experiences as a whole, your young historians will interview someone they personally know who moved to their community as an adult and will then compose a short writing piece based on the interview.
Eleventh graders analyze the fight of African Americans.  In this American History lesson, 11th graders analyze the attitudes towards blacks in the military during WWI.  Students debate the performance of the 92nd division. 
Students interpret historical evidence presented in primary resources. In this Civil War lesson, students examine the service of African Americans in the Civil War and consider their plight to secure the rights and responsibilities of citizenship.
Students examine British Black History. For this current events lesson, students visit selected websites to research the history of Blacks in Great Britain. Several lesson enhancement ideas are included.
Baseball is a relatively high-interest topic through which social studies classes can explore racial prejudice in the US. Video clips provide much of the background information that groups record on their handout and then share with the class. This leads to a discussion on the treatment of African Americans after the Civil War through the 1900s, and other considerations that impacted their acceptance into the major leagues. Once learners have a strong historical foundation for this topic, they are invited to consider whether they now live in a society in which race is not important. They take a position on this topic and write a persuasive essay. This thorough lesson includes everything you'll need, including a rubric and standards.
Learners explore the life and accomplishments of Carter G. Woodson, the father of black history. They read and discuss his educational pursuits and discover he was the second black man in history to receive a doctor's degree. Students then note major events in Dr. Woodson's life.