Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day Teacher Resources

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Students complete an activity with the book Alexander and The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. For this reading comprehension lesson, students take notes on the story in an 8 page book they create. The students use this book to help with retelling the story. 
Pupils read the story Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day and complete discussions questions as they read the story. In this comprehension lesson plan, students also write stories about a good day, write a story about their own terrible day, and write about food they like.
Show young learners the difference between reading in monotone and reading with emotion through reading a short passage in both manners. While listening to a partner read Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, kids think about and record ideas for using expression in writing. One of the links provided has an assessment checklist for the teacher to use, while the other link has an example of a peer-review checklist that could be incorporated.
Young scholars explore language arts by writing a personal story in class. In this story analysis lesson, students read the book Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day. Young scholars discuss the character and the plot before writing their own personal story to share with the class.
Judith Viorst's book Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day is an excellent way to teach youngsters about cause-and-effect relationships in fiction. Use the chart of cause-and-effect situations to introduce this concept, asking kids to come up with personal examples (i.e. "I ran around the whole lunch recess, so I am tired"). After reading half of the text aloud, model how this relationship can be found in the story with the pre-done matching worksheet (consider re-writing it onto chart paper). There is another matching worksheet for the end of the story that kids can complete as practice. For pre-readers, do this together. Explore the word cavity using the simple prompts, which can easily to applied to other vocabulary.
Second graders interact with the story of Alexander's horrible day by connecting it to their lives. They practice predicting, writing paragraphs, reading aloud, discussing his problems, making a card to cheer him up, and designing a pair of shoes for Alexander on Kid Pix. Summative assessment is the Accelerated Reader online quiz, but if you don't have access, a ten-question quiz is available. Link leads to a Lincoln Center interview with author Judith Viorst, geared toward adult readers.
Young scholars investigate different communication techniques by creating a Podcast.  In this language arts lesson, students read Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day and write about a time when they felt like Alexander.  Young scholars create a Podcast song about the story they've just read, and listen to it with their class.
First graders read Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day, write sentence or paragraph about their experience with a bad day, and combine their work with that of classmates to create class book.
Students experiment with word choice and sentence fluency to revise Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst.
Third graders engage in a writing lesson on constructing an introductory paragraph and is also a literature extension activity to be used after reading Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.
Students examine how reading with expression makes stories more interesting by listening to a reading in monotone and one with expression. Reading in pairs, they practice with passages of Judith Voirst's, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day while they complete an evaluation sheet of their partner. As an assessment, they complete a journal entry that describes what happened in the story and illustrate what it looks like to read with expression.
Students practice becoming more fluent readers with fluency by assessing one minute reads and repeated readings. They also practice reading silently and then read the book, "Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day," by Judith Viorst.
Elementary schoolers explore the concept of effective expression. They use oral, written, and visual language to express their emotions. The children write and illusrtate their very own Terrible Day!
Second graders explore cause and effect. They read Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. They discuss their own experiences with bad days. Students identify the causes and effects in the book. They write a letter to Alexander giving him advice on how to avoid having a bad day.
Emerging writers create a portfolio showcasing various writing formats. They discuss Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. They observe the key features of picture books and then create their own book to add to their portfolio. Follow the same process for other writing assignments throughout the year: read and discuss a piece of writing, identify key features of the text, and have learners attempt to create their own piece. 
Students practice reading more fluently with expression and enthusiasm by reading aloud to help them realize how much more exciting and inviting stories can be when read with expression. They encounter the book, "Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day," by Judith Viorst.
Read the story Alexander's Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day to your second grade class. They will either draw a picture of the part of the story that they liked the best or write one sentence about the part that made them laugh. Additionally, they will write 1 sentence about why it made them laugh. Included with this lesson is a cartoon activity to be analyzed or a they put on a puppet show about a bad day.
Students investigate storytelling by analyzing images in a book.  In this reading analysis lesson, students read and analyze the book Alexander and the Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.  Students observe the illustrations in the book and verbally describe what is taking place.
Students explore language arts by reading a classic children's story in class. In this story structure lesson plan, students read the Judith Viorst book, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Students discuss the technique of repeating the catch phrase in the story and complete a graphic organizer based on story structure.
Students read the book Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day and discuss a bad day that they have had. In this bad day lesson plan, students compare their bad day with the story.

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Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day