Allele Teacher Resources

Find Allele educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 426 resources
Pupils observe models of the ABO blood system including erythrocytes, antigens, and antibodies. They investigate the antigens that result from certain allele combinations and move antibodies to determine whether agglutination occurs when two given blood types are mixed.
Nine pages of material on inheritance make up this handout. It begins with a reading on alleles and how they can result in albinism. A chromosome modeling activity and questions follow. Junior geneticists learn to complete Punnett squares and participate in a coin toss simulation of allele pairing. They also learn about sex determination, sickle-cell anemia, and pedigree analysis. This resource provides a variety of activities and information to support several days worth of genetics instruction.
Tenth graders discuss their physical features, and why they look the way they do. They listen as the teacher discusses DNA, alleles, and dominant or recessive genes. Students perform an experiment with different colored markers representing alleles to determine genotype and phenotype ratios among offspring.
Imagine a pair of dragons that produce offspring and determine the percentage of the hatchlings have wings and large antlers. This fantastic activity draws genetics learners in, introduces them to alleles, meiosis, phenotypes, genotypes, and teaches them how to use Punnett squares. The exercises also illustrate the law of independent assortment and linked genes. The handout is ten pages long and will take days to work through, but it will definitely keep learners engaged!
High school biology learners simulate gene flow within a population of fish. They hold colored fish cards as identification and carry "Good & Plenty®” candies to represent alleles, the recessive homozygous of which is lethal. You will need to construct the fish cards and set obstacles up around the room for fish to swim around. 
In this genetics instructional activity, students complete a crossword puzzle by determining the terms associated with the 24 clues given. Students review terms such as phenotype, genotype, alleles, and Mendel.
Using plastic Easter eggs to represent parent phenotypes, genetics enthusiasts simulate the passing of alleles. They record the phenotype of each half of the egg, one representing the mother's and one representing the father's. They determine the genotypes and then solve a Punnett square for their cross. Once they predict the genotype and phenotype of the offspring, they open the egg. You will have pre-planted colored candies within the eggs according to a corresponding phenotype. This is a clever lesson for making the passing of alleles more visual.
Students use a mathematical simulation of genetic drift to answer questions about the factors that influence this evolutionary process. They run a series of simulations varying allele frequency and population size and then analyze their data and propose a model to explain their results. A second set of simulations is performed with natural selection added to the simulation.
In this genetics worksheet, students fill in the blanks with terms related to genes, alleles, genotypes, phenotypes and heredity. They use their answers to complete a joke.
Follow fruit fly genetics with this probability activity. Biology scholars analyze the alleles of Bugsy, Daisy, Dino, and Lulu, considering traits for antennae, wing type, and eye color. They solve Punnett squares to determine the genotypes and phenotypes of their offspring.
In this inheritance patterns instructional activity, students create a visual of a Zork using chromosome strips to represent alleles from the father and the mother to determine the traits in the offspring. Students translate the genotype to the phenotype and compare their Zork to others in the class. Students explain the differences even though the parents of all the Zorks are the same.
In this inheritance worksheet, learners review Mendel's pea plant experiments and compare dominant and recessive alleles. This worksheet has 6 matching, 2 multiple choice, 1 graphic organizer, and 9 fill in the blank questions.
In this genetics worksheet, students review Mendel's genetic experiments on pea plants that led to the understanding of dominant and recessive alleles. This worksheet has 6 matching, 7 true or false, 9 fill in the blank, and 11 short answer questions.
In this genetics worksheet, students review vocabulary terms associated with meiosis, genes, and traits. Students also review the role of alleles. This worksheet has 10 matching, 5 fill in the blank, and 10 multiple choice questions.
For this genetics worksheet, students review vocabulary terms associated with genes, traits, alleles, probability, meiosis, and Punnett square. This worksheet has 10 matching, 5 fill in the blank, and 10 multiple choice questions.
In this genetics worksheet, students review vocabulary words associated with genetics including allele, gamete, hybrid, trait, and Punnett Square. This worksheet has 10 matching, 5 fill in the blank, and 10 multiple choice questions.
Students view a simple ABO blood system for the introduction of this subject using concrete models of eythrocytes (red blood cells, or RBC's), antigens, and antibodies. They can physically see the antigens that result from certain allele combinations and can move antibodies to determine whether agglutination occurs when two given blood types are mixed.
A brief animation introduces heredity to your beginning biologists. They will meet Gregor Mendel's green and yellow peas, dominant and recessive traits, homozygous and heterozygous alleles, and Punnett squares. In this cartoon animation, the peas all have arms, legs, and facial features. Seeing the little pea families makes an endearing introduction to heredity concepts!
Students investigate how selective forces like food, predation and diseases affect evolution. In this genetics lesson, students use red and white beans to simulate the effect of malaria on allele frequencies. They analyze data collected from the experiment and answer analysis questions at the end of the lab.
Young scientists generally love to learn how certain traits can be explained by a direct combination of alleles from their parents. Here, they are able to examine how a phenotype is often expressed as a result of one allele being recessive and one being dominant. This video is very logical and clearly tackles the whole concept, including details about Punnett Squares and probability.

Browse by Subject


Allele