Anglo-Spanish War Teacher Resources

Find Anglo Spanish War educational ideas and activities

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Explore the earliest American cities in this presentation, which details the demographics, geography, and characteristics of New York, Pennsylvania, and the Carolinas, among others. These slides help to fill in the gap between the landing of the Mayflower and the American Revolution.
Students examine the wars the United States was involved in between 1898 and 1945. In groups, they determine the causes and effects of each war and how each war changed the way the United States handled their foreign affairs. As a class, they debate American imperialism and how we have used it to our advantage in each war.
Eighth graders read excerpts from a variety of poems by Hispanic and Spanish authors in Spanish. Individually, they identify any vocabulary they are unfamiliar with and view examples of poetry elements. To end the lesson plan, they research and read poems by authors who are second generation Puerto Rican.
High schoolers examine the U.S.A.'s entry into World War II, and Franklin DO. Roosevelt's foreign policy. They analyze the life of I.E.., the election of 1932, and the New Deal.
When and how did the Cold War begin? To answer this question, you will not find a better-organized, in-depth, activity- and inquiry-based resource than this! Executing best teaching practices throughout, each portion of this inquiry involves detailed analysis of primary and secondary source material, supporting learners as they develop an answer to the resource's guiding question.
Before seeing this presentation, your class might not have a grasp of the contributions to art, science, and politics made by the Dutch in the 16th and 17th centuries. Comprehensive and engaging, the many images and discussion points in this slideshow will keep viewers' attention throughout your lecture on world history.
Students examine the history of Spanish in what is now the United States. They examine the current language status of the Hispanic population. Students are able to characterize Spanglish and Chicano English. They examine some features of Chicano English.
Young scholars research the impact of American Imperialism. In this Spanish-American War lesson, students visit the listed Web sites to discover details about the war and its effects. Young scholars use the information they locate to participate in a debate over Imperialistic activities.
In this Arizona history instructional activity, students read a 5 page selection that includes primary sources about time periods in the state's history. Students then respond to 5 short answer questions based on the selection.
Learners examine the influences of the Hispanic groups from Mexico, Cuba and Puerto Rico. In groups, they research the history of Mexico and read excerpts from a book in Spanish to practice their vocabulary. To end the lesson, they write letters to the Embassy of Mexico in New York to ask for information about the Hispanic cultures in the American Southwest.
Take your class through the period between World War I and World War II. Covering various treaties and pacts between America and its neighbors - namely, Japan, Germany, and the Soviet Union- these slides could inspire some political discussions about America's reluctance to enter WWII until absolutely necessary. Some minor picture resizing could make the slides easier to read.
In this online interactive history quiz activity, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about James Madison. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Students, in groups, participate in a variety of activities regarding the rise of Anglo-American immigration in the 1840s and its impact upon California. They discuss immigration from the West and the East as it influenced the culture of California.
Students construct appropriate maps to depict the following information: changes in European territorial claims as a result of the French and Indian War; boundaries of British East and West Florida; significant rivers and settlements of British West Flori
Learners identify the meaning of the following terms: immigrant, immigration, migrate, and assimilation. They identify reasons that immigrant groups came to Texas and explain where groups settle and the influence these groups have on the diversity of Texas.
Pupils examine the photographs of Russell Lee and identify the obstacles faced by Mexican-Americans in Texas during the early and mid-20th century. They discuss the ways they overcame these obstacles and relate it to obstacles in their own lives.
Students analyze Russell Lee's photo essay as a sign of segregation in Texas. They consider the differences between primary and secondary sources and how historians use these sources.
What does it mean to "be of good character"? What are the qualities that define such a person? The 1825 Colonization Law of Coahuila y Texas required that all new immigrants into Mexican Texas present documentation that they were of good character. Class groups read a series of primary source testimonials and generate a list of traits valued in the documents. Individuals then craft a letter of recommendation for an imagined settler.
Students describe the events that led to various immigrant groups settling in New Orleans; differentiate between the white and black Creole population; explain the results of each immigrant group's relocation; and determine the areas of religious settlers
Students research the issues and relationships between 2 refugee groups--the Seminole and African slaves. They analyze primary documents and discuss the effects of racism in the 21st century.

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Anglo-Spanish War