Anthropology Teacher Resources

Find Anthropology educational ideas and activities

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Students examine the combined subjects of anthropology and sociology and explain how the disciplines would study the same issue. On poster board, they locate or draw pictures related to the two subjects. Once this is completed, students write summaries comparing and contrasting anthropology and sociology.
Students analyze anthropological case studies. In this specific Ethical Dilemmas lesson, students make ethical judgments based on the case study analysis. Students work cooperatively in small groups to reach their conclusions.
High schoolers study the four main subdivisions of anthropology and how they overlap. They explore the careers of several contemporary anthropologists and their fieldwork, comparing the methods and applications of their work.
Artists compare and contrast artistic form and content. They investigate artistic and anthropological practices of collecting. The class explores the concept of collecting in other fields outside of Art.
Students research and discuss many common characteristics of modern cultures and examine ancient cultures for comparison. They study the components of anthropology and ethnocentrism.
By posing controversial questions about racially charged words and jokes, this presentation explores the function and use of ethnic humor. Sure to inspire debates and discussions in your sociology or anthropology class, the slideshow comes to a fascinating conclusion that will have your students talking long after the lecture.
Twelfth graders explore women (or men if they are underrepresented) who are leaders and achievers in the particular core content curriculum area.  For this Anthropology lesson, 12th graders study the women who have distinguished themselves and made significant contributions within the field of anthropology.
In this word search worksheet, students locate 20 vocabulary words related to physical anthropology. The word list includes allele, amino acids, and taxonomy.
Twelfth graders identify women who have excelled in anthropology. They present their findings which are compiled with other students' research to produce a list of women anthropologists.
Students, in groups, operate the GPS unit, plotting each head stone with accompanying description. Two other students to log in data that corresponds to the given points. One student to note general observations
Does the human body evolve as quickly as human culture? With a stellar 15-minute video, explore the trait of lactose intolerance. Only about 1/3 of human adults seem to still have the enzyme lactase and therefore, the ability to digest lactose. Scientists look at the DNA and the history of two cultures that might explain why. Follow the video with one of the accompanying lab activities in which biochemistry learners measure glucose changes over time after adding lactose (milk) to simulated intestinal fluid samples (lactase solution). This is a thick and creamy lesson!
Introduce young scholars to the ways in which land and people have a relationship. They examine the types of food local tribes have traditionally consumed and ways in which the people and the land both benefited from the act of harvesting. A secondary emphasis is placed on the role elders play in educating younger generations on what to harvest and how to respect the land. 
Students examine the cause and effect relationship between geography and ancient civilizations. After reading an article, they determine how new findings can help scientists examine the migration patterns of these civilizations. Using the internet, they research how climate and geography affected prehistoric humans and create their own dioramas. They reflect on these issues in their journals.
This lesson will help students examine their preconceptions and assumptions about racial categories and understand the impossibility of constructing a consistent system of human racial classification.
This computer-based lesson will enable students to test their notions of "racial" similarity and difference by comparing mtDNA sequences as the students do in the first episode of RACE - The Power of an Illusion.
High schoolers investigate the mystery of Stonehenge. In this Stonehenge lesson, students participate in a classroom activity that requires them to research information about Stonehenge as well as information regarding archeology and anthropology. High schoolers apply scientific investigation skills to other ancient discoveries.
Students brainstorm a list of stereotypes associated with the Hispanic or Latin culture. In groups, they use the internet to research issues of importance to the Puerto Rican community. They focus on the cultures that speak Spanish and how ethnicity applies to various groups within the United States. To end the lesson, they read a poem and write their reflections.
Students construct a timeline of four major culture periods in Native American history from studying archaeological evidence cards.
Creating learning centers with artifact-related activities are a great way to promote deductive reasoning and critical thinking skills.
Ninth graders participate in class discussion about culture and how it influences our lives then complete an analysis of advertisements from popular magazines to derive what effects they have on our culture. They use analysis of adds to draw ideas about g