Art, Music, Literature by Era Teacher Resources

Find Art, Music, Literature by Era educational ideas and activities

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Students use at least one database to find relevant materials on their topic. In this African American History lesson plan, student record relevant information in their own words and prepare a 1-2 page biographical sketch on an African-American pioneer in science, inventions, discovery, or the arts.
Satires may be designed to expose a bias to ridicule but if misunderstood can they reinforce that bias? Langston Hughes poem, “Minstrel Man” opens a discussion of racist stereotypes, the minstrel tradition, and the musical, “The Scottsboro Boys.” Class members watch a video, read a New York Times review of the play and discuss these sensitive topics. Preview the richly detailed plan and decide if appropriate for your classroom.
Students examine the events of the Harlem Renaissance. Using art, music and literature from the time period, they discover the hopes and dreams of the authors and composers. They discuss what the Harlem Renaissance gave to the African-Americans what they did not have before the Great Migration.
Young scholars explore the role of protest songs. In this early American history lesson, students research the acts passed by the British that angered colonists. Young scholars then listen to protest songs from contemporary American history prior to writing their own songs of protests about the events they researched.
Students explore the contributions of African Americans of the 20th century. In this African American history lesson, students examine portraits of Muhammad Ali, Romare Bearden, Lorraine Hansberry, Judith Jamison, and Leontyne Price in efforts to analyze the images and make inferences prior to discovering their individual contributions.
Students explore the contributions of African Americans of the 20th century. In this African American history lesson plan, students examine portraits of Muhammad Ali, Romare Bearden, Lorraine Hansberry, Judith Jamison, and Leontyne Price in efforts to analyze the images and make inferences prior to discovering their individual contributions.
Stereotype or archetype? Myth or fact? Middle schoolers apply critical thinking skills to assess the validity of the images and story details in picture books portraying Native American history. The study begins with an examination of Susan Jeffers’ Brother Eagle, Sister Sky, listed as a book to avoid by the Oyate website. The plan details how to direct readers’ attention to the messages sent by illustrations and how to check the facts of a story. As a contrast, class members are introduced to Joseph Bruchac’s Between Earth and Sky: Legends of Native American Sacred Places and create their own compass rose.
This lesson focuses on how the blues both operates as poetry and informs the poetry of many prominent African American poets. Students consider the poetic devices and recurring themes in blues lyrics and the significance of the poetry of the blues as part
Students are introduced to American personalities whose fame and contributions have left, and continue to leave a mark in American history.
Twelfth graders learn art is an effective way to convey a political message. They learn how political messages are created to convey a message. They analyze a piece of artwork and then write a short paragraph from the point of view of one of the characters represented.
Students gain insight into the Civil War era by exploring the art, music, and literature of the time.
High schoolers interpret historical evidence presented in primary resources. In this women's history instructional activity, students examine the role of women prior to and following the suffrage movement. High schoolers also read selected pieces of women's literature.
American dream or American nightmare? Whether born in the USA or having come to America, we, the people of the United States, are prompted by a vision. Explore that vision through a series of materials and activities. Although designed as extension projects for gifted, self-guided learners, the materials and activities in this resource can be used to introduce a vision or unifying principle for a semester or year-long American literature course. The activities can also be easily adapted for group projects and the portfolio assignment can serve as a final assessment. A great packet that deserves a place in your curriculum library. 
"Can a museum be a catalyst in a community? Can a museum house artists and allow them to be change agents as communities re-think themselves?" Watch as curator Thelma Golden re-imagines the museum as a think tank and explores the capacity of artists to understand and re-write history. While the speaker expresses a particular focus on on Black artists, a primary theme of her presentation is how art can change the way we think about culture and ourselves.
Students examine the life style of the 1930's using art, music, the Internet and interviews as resources. They complete worksheets including a Venn diagram comparing two pieces of artwork. They determine what life during the Great Depression was like through these lessons.
Discover details about 1920's America. In this American history lesson, learners read From the Great War to the Great Depression. Students then research famous Americans from the time period and present their findings to their classmates.
African American history during the Jim Crow era includes encounters with poverty, racism, disrespect, and protest. Harper Lee develops all four of these themes in her famous 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird. To help students understand these ideas, this
Eleventh graders explore, examine and study about the impact of the Harlem Renaissance on the American culture. They assess and explain how the Harlem Renaissance was a "rebirth" for the African American culture through art, music, and literature.
Second graders examine poetry in the context of American History in the four lessons of this unit. They read, write, and edit their own pieces in this unit.
Students research one of the Plains or Northwest Native American tribes that the Oregon Trail travelers might have encountered in their journey west. In this American history lesson, students research the tribes, complete a journal entry for the topic, read a book about the topic, and make a digital scrapbook for the topic. Students may also take part in food tasting of the time and create crafts from the era.