Atlantic Slave Trade Teacher Resources

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Students study the trans-Atlantic Slave trade. In this slave trade instructional activity, students study the Constitutional Convention Notes and the impact on United States slavery. Students research the slave trade database and other primary sources to complete the evidence worksheets. Students write about the topic using the given prompt.
Students investigate the Atlantic slave trade. In this slavery lesson, students watch "Slavery, Society, and Apartheid," as well as "Slave Ship." Students discuss the information presented in the videos, especially St. John's Revolt. Students write creative pieces from the perspectives of those involved in the revolt.
Students study the Tran-Atlantic Slave Trade and learn to evaluate historical arguments. In this slave trade instructional activity, students read about the Atlantic Slave System. Students take notes on slave trade and make a timeline for the information. Students then design questions to argue against David Brion Davis' historical argument. Students design search queries based on their questions and then research the queries. Students create posters for their arguments.
Pupils create graphs, routes, and write an essay based on their research of the slave trade. In this slave trade lesson plan, students research the Middle Passage and how slave trade happened in the United States.
In this geography worksheet, students complete 2 graphic organizers by noting how 4 situations led to development of the Atlantic slave trade and noting 4 consequences of the Atlantic slave trade. Students also write a descriptive paragraph utilizing 2 related vocabulary terms.
This presentation offers an overview of the Atlantic slave trade, taking care to give the subject its due diligence and explain the origins of slavery, the types of products slaves were forced to harvest, the most common importers of slaves in the Caribbean and Brazil, how Europeans acquired slaves through trading, etc. The narrator emphasizes understanding the economics of slavery to fully comprehend the tragedy of the institution, and offers startling statistics to the uniquely horrifying nature of chattel slavery in the Atlantic.
Students examine the slave trade. In this research skills lesson, students research the slave trade in a selected country. Students use databases to locate pertinent information in order to prepare an oral presentation.
The horrors of the Atlantic slave trade are covered in this presentation. Intended as an accent to a lecture, learners will see images, answer questions, and engage in an activity intended to help them understand the conditions of Middle Passage.
What was the main cause of European colonization in America? How did Thomas Paine's Common Sense play a role in the establishment of the United States? What was the trans-Atlantic slave trade? These are just a few of the many questions that your learners will consider as they complete this 22-question, multiple-choice assessment on the foundations of the American nation.
Seventh graders investigate the slave trade. In this Middle Passage lesson, 7th graders read excerpts of ship logs from Connecticut Slave Trade ships. Students respond to the provided analysis questions based on the logs. 
Sixth graders examine how Africans were treated in the Caribbean and Haiti after reading about the Atlantic Slave Trade. From a multicultural information passage, they complete a time line on Toussiant L-Ouverture and write an obituary.
Actual ship diagrams and a table of voyage data gives young historians an authentic glimpse of on-board experiences during the Atlantic Slave Trade. The class examines a projected diagram of the slave ship Brooks, recording thoughts. Consider pair-share before the group discusses the image. The group continues to examine a chart depicting voyage data, and answers analysis questions. Conclude with a class discussion or a writing assignment (prompts and sources included).
Students research the Atlantic slave trade during the 18th century. In this slave trade lesson, students read a narrative about colonial expansion in the Americas and the rise of slavery in the United States. Students write down what they know about the Atlantic slave trade in the 18th Century and answer questions in the form of an essay, narrative, or a journal entry.
Students examine the impact the Atlantic Slave Trade had on Africa and the African people, through the analysis of literature and film. They identify the geographic regions of Africa and locate selected African countries, countries that are used as later case studies in the examination the legacy of slavery and colonialism
Students discuss the Atlantic slave trade and the facts about the St. John revolt.  In this investigative lesson students write a personal account of a person involved in the revolt. 
Use best-teaching practices to discuss the practices and implications of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Here you'll find a detailed lesson plan involving a variety of collaborative and engaging components, including image analysis, group reading and discussion, and a final group project whereby learners contribute to a creative class mural reflecting what they have learned.
Students develop a memorial to the slave who endured the Middle Passage. In this slavery memorial lesson, student culminate a unit of study about slavery by creating a memorial for Africans who traveled the Middle Passage to slavery. They develop an inscription for a plaque that tells about the Middle Passage, the economic factors that contributed to slavery and describes the terrible conditions on the ships.
Students discuss the history of trading slaves. For this history lesson, students read about slave trade and discuss it. They work in groups and use the NoteFolio.
Examine three perspectives of the slave trade - captain, sailor, and captive - through this collaborative analysis activity. Small groups study one perspective with a primary source to analyze. They discern what is a historical fact and what is an inference, recording their findings in a graphic organizer. Two of the three documents, however, don't provide much information, especially pertaining to facts (one is simply an image). Consider providing more detailed sources.
Students, after reading the Transatllantic Slave Trade, create a color coded triple-timeline to help them explain the chronological streams that flow through the essay.

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Atlantic Slave Trade