Banking Teacher Resources

Find Banking educational ideas and activities

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The first several minutes of this clip are a review of the hypothetical China-U.S. trade scenario Sal mapped out in previous videos. Then, he begins to further outline how the Yuan can resist appreciation because of interference by the Chinese Central Bank and it's desire to peg the current exchange rate. Learners explore the Chinese government's solution of printing Yuan, exchanging for dollars, and investing in a safe, dollar-denominated liquid asset: U.S. treasuries. He leads economists into considering the impact of large-scale loans from the Chinese government on the US economy and debt.
Here is a detailed breakdown of the traditional banking system, including the roles that intermediaries play as brokers and in making loans, as well as an introduction to the parallel system of shadow banking.
Why was there a lack of confidence in the money and banking system of the early United States government? What historical events led to the establishment of the Federal Reserve System? Here you'll find reading materials and worksheets to help your class members learn more about the early history of banking in the nation.
What does an examiner look for when analyzing a bank's financial condition? In addition to learning about the 5-Cs for reviewing loans and CAMELS (capital, assets, management, earnings, liquidity, and sensitivity to risk), your learners discover how the Federal Reserve supervises and regulates banks in order to avoid bank runs and financial instability.
Exploring a world with more than one bank, Sal illustrates the balance sheets of each fictional bank, as well as explaining the possible problems that could result with inconsistent reserve ratios requirements. The video details how one bank run can affect everyone, creating "a weak link in the chain" of commerce.
Addressing the concept of reserve ratios, Sal outlines the necessity and purpose of regulating the reserves within the banking system. He describes how an ideal banking system stays liquid, whereas a chaotic banking system might experience a bank run. This video would be ideal in an economics lecture, or even in a history class addressing the bank runs during the Great Depression.
After a short review on the banking process and lending procedures, Sal outlines some of the problems and weaknesses of fractional reserve banking. Additionally, he details the differences between illiquidity and insolvency, as well as how one weak bank in a fractional reserve banking system can make life difficult for an entire economy.
Sal explains the concepts of bank notes in this video, leading viewers to the natural conclusion that his illustration looks a lot like a dollar bill - and therefore, one is very much like the other. Wealth creation and the Federal Reserve Bank are two important topics that your class will easily understand after seeing this lecture.
Taking viewers through the process of creating a reserve bank (Federal Reserve), Sal introduces the idea of government involvement in modern banking. Additionally, he explains the obligation of the government to cover the reserves, and why bonds issued by the government are risk-free.
Going deeper into the concept of the Federal Funds Rate, this video guides viewers through the process of inter-bank lending, much like the previous video (Banking 14). Sal's easygoing approach is simple to understand and fun to watch.
Can a bank issue endless loans and checking accounts without regard to the amount of money within its walls? Sal addresses this question throughout the lecture, where he introduces the concept of bank regulations - specifically reserve requirements. Viewers consider the perspective of the banking institution to improve their knowledge of economics, but additionally, to make them smarter consumers.
Why carry around a heavy suitcase full of gold when you can write a check to your neighbor in the village? Sal's village banks flourishes in this video with the introduction of checks, demonstrating how a check essentially works. While this video is helpful for those interested in economics, anyone who is about to gain access to a checking account could use the lesson provided here.
With just 1000 pieces of fictional gold, Sal takes viewers through the process of fractional reserve banking. He explains how deposits made into a bank can be both assets and liabilities, and the role of having reserves. Additionally, he demonstrates the multiplier effect to show how the modern banking system is sustained.
Using his example of a growing village bank, Sal (the narrator) explains the ins and outs of the banking business, mostly from the perspective of the banker. This point of view can be helpful for people who see the bank as an institution that simply holds money, without considering the costs and liabilities of said institution.
As an introduction to the institution and function of banks in society, this video walks viewers through the concept of banking with colorful annotations and simplified narration. The lecture evolves naturally into a discussion about interest and investments, as well as identifying assets and liabilities. Social Studies and economics pupils will enjoy this straightforward and intuitive approach to modern banking.
Students examine the economic crisis of 2008. In this banking bailout lesson, students read the provided articles "Nicole Bradbury: Robo-Signer Victim," and  "Bankers' Sloppy and Illegal Work." Students respond to the provided discussion questions.
High schoolers explore the purpose of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. In this global issues lesson, students participate in a role play activity that requires them to make funding decisions as members of the World Bank. High schoolers also complete discussion questions about the International Monetary Fund and World Bank Brief.
Here is an interesting topic. Learners examine the economics that led to the founding of the First Bank of America. They participate in a reader's theater experience depicting the debate between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson over the beginnings of the first Bank of the United States. They read primary source documents and the booklet, "The First Bank of the United States." A fun way to introduce banking and US Economics.
Twelfth graders describe the purposes and functions of different international organizations. They discover the United States role in these organizations and the role of the World Bank.
Students assess the validity of a national bank. They study the importance of McCullough v. Maryland. They review the arguments of Hamilton and Jefferson. They analyze the Tenth Amendment and the debate over state v. federal power. They review tight v. lose constructionist interpretation of the Constitution.