Barbados Teacher Resources

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First graders read a story and locate where the countries in the story are located. In this traditions lesson, 1st graders explore food dishes from different countries and discuss where they are located. Students tell their favorite family traditions and favorite family recipes. Students chart the food dishes in the story.
Fifth graders will understand what the United Nations Organization does and will be able to identify the aims and purposes of the United Nations. They recognize the seven key areas of the Millennium Declaration.
"There is something irresistible about popcorn" and about activities designed to accompany the reading of a really good book. The nine activities in this packet support the reading of Elizabeth George Speare's Newbery Award winning novel, The Witch of Blackbird Pond. Included are detailed directions for the activities, assessment strategies and rubrics, materials and equipment lists, links to related URLs, and all necessary worksheets. 
This presentation offers an overview of the Atlantic slave trade, taking care to give the subject its due diligence and explain the origins of slavery, the types of products slaves were forced to harvest, the most common importers of slaves in the Caribbean and Brazil, how Europeans acquired slaves through trading, etc. The narrator emphasizes understanding the economics of slavery to fully comprehend the tragedy of the institution, and offers startling statistics to the uniquely horrifying nature of chattel slavery in the Atlantic.
How did American colonists react to the Stamp Act of 1765? Your young historians will examine primary source material by reading excerpts from a transcription of the Pennsylvania Gazette and then identifying the sentiments expressed by colonists toward this tax. They will also compare the transmission of information today to that of colonial times, and will conclude by composing a letter to the editor of the Gazette from the perspective of a colonist. Tip: To easily locate the primary source document that is the main focus of this lesson, go to the provided link and find November 7 within the page.
Use this exceptional resource to examine the discourse and debate that occurred at the start of the War of 1812 with your class. Learners will first consider their own position on the war in a silent journal writing activity. Then after consulting primary source documents through guided instruction, independent practice, and working in pairs, your class will come together to summarize source material and construct an informed argument on the issue.

New Review Arctic Food Chain

Explore the food chains that support Arctic ecosystems. A class discussion on interdependence and the different roles plants and animals play in ecosystems provides young scholars with the knowledge to complete a worksheet asking them to create food chains involving a variety of Arctic life. To further engage students in the lesson, consider assigning each child an Arctic plant or animal and having the class arrange and rearrange themselves into food chains. This resource would fit perfectly into a unit investigating the different types of ecosystems found around the world.
From days of 24 hour sunlight, to endless nights that last for days, the Arctic is a very unique place to live. Examine the seasonal changes that occur in the northern-most reaches of the globe and the impact they have on the plants and animals living there. The included worksheet offers a number of different opportunities for learners to demonstrate their understanding of this unique region. This lesson would fit nicely in either a unit on ecosystems or weather and climate in an upper-elementary science class.
This resource is rich with primary and secondary source material regarding major events in the Atlantic world during the Age of Revolution. While there are suggested classroom activities toward the beginning of the resource, its true value lies in the reproductions of such major historical documents as the United States Declaration of Independence, the Haitian Declaration of Independence, and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Use the sentence frames in the Classroom Guide as a solid framework for considering the theme of freedom and what it means to different individuals as you review the instructional materials.
Who are "the most pernicious race of little odious vermin that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth”? Readers of Gulliver’s Travels will learn the answer, as the journey with Lemuel Gulliver to Lilliput, Brobdingnag, and to the country of the Houyhnhnms. Prepare class members for Gulliver’s adventures with a teacher’s guide that includes background on Jonathan Swift, chapter by-chapter summaries, suggestions for pre-reading activities, discussion questions, and a link to vocabulary activities.
Learn about life in the Arctic while practicing how to graph and interpret data with this interdisciplinary instructional activity. Starting with a whole group data-gathering exercise, students are then given a worksheet on which they analyze and create bar and pie graphs involving information about Arctic animals. This instructional activity is perfect for tying together a math unit on representing data and a science exploration of Arctic ecosystems. 

New Review Shapes

Investigate the properties of three-dimensional figures with this Arctic-themed math lesson. Beginning with a class discussion about different types of solid figures present in the classroom, young mathematicians are then given a two-sided worksheet asking them to draw 3-D shapes, identify their parts, and create cubes from a series of nets. Though the lesson does not provide any detailed information about the Arctic, it is does provide a fun change of pace to a geometry unit in the upper-elementary grades.

New Review Take 6

Investigate the various properties of the number six with this elementary math lesson. From simple addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems to the creation of hexagonal tessellations, this lesson covers all aspects of this simple number. As a lesson, this would best fit in a geometry unit introducing hexagons, but the included worksheet could also stand alone as an option for early finishers.
Where is HIV/AIDS most prevalent and what are the current trends regarding HIV? Have groups work together to map the world's HIV/AIDS rates, then create a class map with all the data. Lesson includes cross-disciplinary concepts including world geography, economics, and science. By including the extension activity, learners are able to become ambassadors of the countries they research, helping others to gain a better understanding of the political and economic issues affecting the regions. 
This complete set of instructions for creating your very own butterfly garden and habitat is so cool! With some seeds and the handy resources in this activity, you and your class will be able to determine which type of habitat is best for your area and what types of butterflies the plants you've added to your garden will attract. Everything needed is included in the instructional activity. All you have to do is print, plant, and explore your new butterfly habitat. Tip: After the plants are established, send observation teams out every day to track what types of butterflies are visiting your garden.
As part of a study of the settling of the Carolinas, class members read a 1663 report by William Hilton, an English explorer who wrote about the geography and native inhabitants of the Cape Fear River region. To help develop their sense of chronology, individuals read a portion of Hilton's journal, and create a series of diary entries recounting the events of October 24th through October 31st. Other activities ask learners to examine multiple perspectives of events, and encourage them to build historical empathy.
Engage readers of Gulliver’s Travels with a series of worksheets that include pre-reading activities, vocabulary exercises, comprehension questions, and close reading checks. Designed for younger learners, the focus of the packet is on tracking Gulliver’s adventures and does not directly address the novel as a satire.
When studying the slave trade in early American and world history, use this document to expose your learners to the abhorrent conditions that existed on slave ships. Read through two first-person accounts of the enslavement process, including capture, and the actual grueling journey on a slave ship.
This lesson has it all, primary source documents, an interactive trade game, clear teacher background information, and sailing to the West Indies chance cards. You will play, trade, and live out the experiences of early colonists in order to foster an understanding of triangular trade and English trade regulation occurring during the American Revolution. Fifth grade Social Studies is in the bag!
Learners construct a model of the hydrologic cycle, and observe that water is an element of a cycle in the natural environment. They explain how the hydrologic cycle works and why it is important, and compare the hydrologic cycle to other cycles found in nature. This is one of the most thoroughly thought-through, one-period lesson plans I've ever come across!

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