Biochemistry Teacher Resources

Find Biochemistry educational ideas and activities

Showing 21 - 40 of 292 resources
In this biochemistry worksheet, students complete a table by filling in the missing information about different elements. Students draw the Bohr diagram and the Lewis dot diagram for several atoms.
In this biochemistry worksheet, students complete a crossword puzzle with 36 questions. They identify different polymers and functional groups.
For this proteins worksheet, students review how amino acids are sequenced to determine types of proteins. Students also review how proteins are used by the body. This worksheet has 2 drawing and 24 fill in the blank statements.
In this lipids worksheet, students review the different types of lipids and how lipids are used by the body. This worksheet has 3 drawings and 27 fill in the blank statements.
In this nutrient worksheet, students compare the chemicals that make up living things: vitamins and minerals, lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. This worksheet has 2 drawings and 32 fill in the blank statements.
In this biochemistry instructional activity, students draw structures of the given molecules. Students identify the products in the illustrated reaction. Provided with a spectrum, students draw a compound.
After studying the different aspects of atoms and their reactivity, pupils will find this summary PowerPoint useful for review. Some of the slides are informative with labeled diagrams; others give important vocabulary. Teachers may want to take sections of this slide show to use as a supplement to other chemistry lessons.
High schoolers conduct a variety of experiments to explore gel electrophoresis. In this biology lesson, explain how this process separate DNA and RNA. They discuss the practical applications of this method.
After studying the different aspects of atoms and their reactivity, students will find this summary PowerPoint useful for review.  Some of the slides are informative with labelled diagrams, others require sentences to be completed with important vocabulary (not included). Teachers may want to take sections of this slide show to use as a supplement to other chemistry lessons.
High schoolers conduct a series of activities to explore the nature of cells. In this biology lesson, students observe plant and animal cells under the microscope and compare them. They differentiate osmosis and diffusion.
Students examine the basics of starch and how it is used in food. In this photosynthesis lesson students experiment with variables that affect starch production in photosynthesis.
Students explore enzymes and what can inhibit and act as a catalyst for them.  In this enzymes instructional activity students complete experiments on enzyme properties.
In the deserts of Arizona and New Mexico, some tiny creatures show just how quickly natural selection can turn a mutation into an advantageous adaptation. Watch a video about rock pocket mice, who show that one small change can make all the difference in survival when the landscape changes drastically. After watching the video, high schoolers take a look at the Hardy-Weinberg theorem, perform some calculations regarding the frequency of heterozygous genotypes in the rock pocket mouse population, and answer some short analysis questions. 
Discuss how diseases have impacted human history. Divide your class into groups and assign each group one of the following: tuberculosis, malaria, plague, cholera, smallpox, and AIDS. They read up on, complete a concept map, and present to the rest of the class their assigned disease. Afterward, they create artwork and write a paragraph about it. This could be used in a life science class when studying microbiology as a way to demonstrate how it impacts society and as a way to incorporate history, writing, and art into your curriculum. 
Does the human body evolve as quickly as human culture? With a stellar 15-minute video, explore the trait of lactose intolerance. Only about 1/3 of human adults seem to still have the enzyme lactase and therefore, the ability to digest lactose. Scientists look at the DNA and the history of two cultures that might explain why. Follow the video with one of the accompanying lab activities in which biochemistry learners measure glucose changes over time after adding lactose (milk) to simulated intestinal fluid samples (lactase solution). This is a thick and creamy lesson plan!
Though it isn't a novel activity to prepare onion cell and Elodea plant cell slides as examples of cells in a microbiology unit, this resource will leave you thoroughly prepared. As pupils examine the slides that they prepare, they draw what they see. The instructional activity is part of a larger comprehensive unit on microbes that you will definitely want to consider.
In an introductory lesson plan, youngsters take a pre-assessment quiz, get a grasp of a gram of mass, and then estimate the mass of microorganisms that live within a human body. Using Glo Germ™, a material that allows you to simulate the passing of germs by hands, mini microbiologists get an ultraviolet view of the importance of hand washing. To close, small groups construct a concept map of what they have learned, one that will be added to throughout the unit. A wonderful kick-start to a unit that is a whole new world!
Life science learners need to be able to use a microscope. With this comprehensive resource, they first experience how lenses and magnification work, and then get familiar with using a compound microscope. Tremendous background information, detailed set-up and procedure instructions, and even a video that acts as a teaching guide, work together to thoroughly prepare you to implement this classic and vital lesson. 
Following directions from a colorful slide preparation card, beginning biologists examine three different live microorganisms: bacteria, yeast, and paramecia. This is not an unusual activity to do with your class, but if you are doing it for the first time or need a refresher, the lesson plan is so well-written that you will have no questions. Just make sure to order your live specimens early enough to have them on time.
Small groups of life science learners look at Allison's symptoms and discuss a diagnosis. They use a chart of illnesses and draw symptom clues from an envelope to determine what illness she has. A lesson like this gives children an opportunity to role-play and practice critical thinking skills. 

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