Canada and World War I Teacher Resources

Find Canada and World War I educational ideas and activities

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Creating an artifact that is representative of a specific time period provides an opportunity for amateur historians to understand the importance of primary sources. This resource describes the process for students to explore original or replica artifacts before researching and creating one from the era they are studying. These could include simulated diaries, propaganda posters, recipes, etc. A fun and educational activity!
Tenth graders discuss the events leading up to antisemitic behavior in Europe during World War II. Through various activities, 10th graders acquaint themselves with the political ideology of Nazism and assess responsibility for the Holocaust. Materials to complete this unit are included.
Students analyze different perspectives of the history of the Holocaust. They experience primary and secondary sources along with pieces from literature, documentaries, songs and letters. A commitment of honor and dedication is expressed through the thoughts and feelings experienced by the survivors of the Holocaust viewed in this lesson.
Seventh graders explore the geography of Eastern and Western Europe. They compare and constrast the culture of Jewish people from Eastern and Western Europe. They analyze deportation and confinement in concentration camps, using personal testimonies.
Students examine the wars the United States was involved in between 1898 and 1945. In groups, they determine the causes and effects of each war and how each war changed the way the United States handled their foreign affairs. As a class, they debate American imperialism and how we have used it to our advantage in each war.
Students examine the contributions of African Americans in New Haven, Connecticut in the 19th and 20th centuries. After being introduced to new vocabulary, they review the elements of autobiographies and read excerpts of African American authors. To end the lesson they wrwite their own autobiography and interview a parent to gather more about their family history.
Eleventh graders trace the history of intolerance in American history and familiarize themselves with the actions of the United States towards the Holocaust. They explore present day Holocaust denial and Neo-Nazism in the United States.
Students create new words to convey their thoughts. They find, list and discuss the poetic devices used by the poet in creating his or her war poem and create their own war poems. They use sensory perception words and memory in creating a poem.
Students consider the meaning of loyalty. They explore the history of Japanese in the United States. and consider the meaning of citizenship. They create a presentation for the class. It can be a poster, Power Point or other computer-generated presentation.
Students examine seven different African-American artists. In groups, they use the internet to identify their contribution and techniques to the art world and examine the time period in which the artwork was produced. To end the lesson, they use the knowledge they have gathered to write a play or story.
Eleventh graders research and examine the significant individuals of the 1920s and their impact on American society. They identify characteristics of people who make a difference, and in pairs conduct research on two people with differing points of view from the 1920s. Each pair presents a dialogue performed as the two people researched.
Learners investigate the context, issues, important people, and outcomes of the Civil Rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. They attempt to answer the essential question, "Would the Civil Rights movement of the 1950's and 60's have happened if Martin Luther King, Jr. had never been born?" They research primary and secondary sources.
Students examine the Grand Alliance between the U.S., Great Britain, and the Soviet Union during World War II. They analyze primary sources, examine maps, answer discussion questions, conduct research, and write an essay.
In this 20th century American history worksheet, students read "Changing Ways of Life," and then respond to 5 main idea and critical thinking questions about 1920's America.
This is a handout of four different timelines. It contains four columns, each provides a chronological list of event starting in 1776 and ending in 2001. Timelines showcase changes and major historical events for the Portland Observatory, Portland MA, Maine, and the United States in general. This could be a big help in comparing times and locations for some of our country's biggest events. 
For this online interactive history quiz worksheet, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about Albert Einstein. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
In this online interactive literature instructional activity, students respond to 8 short answer and essay questions about Michael Cunningham's The HoursStudents may check some of their answers online.
In this online interactive history quiz activity, students respond to 50 multiple choice questions about Queen Victoria. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
In this online interactive history quiz learning exercise, students respond to 34 multiple choice questions about Mother Jones. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
Tenth graders explore the self through a study of autobiographies. By writing daily in their journals, they improve their writing skills and write reflection pieces at the end of the year. Through a series of writing assignments, 10th graders explore various cultures and describe their personal reactions to the scenarios.

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Canada and World War I