Carpentry Teacher Resources

Find Carpentry educational ideas and activities

Showing 21 - 40 of 109 resources
Upper graders become "shipwreck detectives" by studying the debris field from a shipwreck in the Aegean Sea which took place in the 700s.  A website is accessed that gives specific information about the debris field, and pairs of young scholars fill out a worksheet embedded in the plan that categorizes the majority of debris found in quadrants that are delineated in the worksheet. Learners see how studying wrecks like this one can lead to the acquisition of quite a bit of knowledge about a culture.
This video shows a basic real-world example of absolute value. One must find the range of acceptable values given a specified margin of error.
Mona Lisa is a classic painting, perfect for building visual literacy and observation skills. Your class will analyze the painting, learn about Leonardo da Vinci, and complete up to nine different art-based activities. Just print to learn!
Imagine building a five-story wooden temple with no nails or crafting a wooden bird that can fly for three days. These achievements by the originator of Chinese carpentry and craftsmanship stand alongside his invention of the carpenterÕs square, the ink marker, drill, and ladder. An overview of Chinese architecture, this video looks at some of the countryÕs most famous structures.
Have your class draw the plans and design a structure. Learners discuss and investigate the variables in the stability of a 2D and 3D model. They also consider how to add a circuit to the design. Afterwards, they present their work.
Junior archaeologists will be able to describe shipwreck artifacts and the information they reveal. They work in small groups to reasearch wreckage features of different period ships, making this not only a science lesson, but a social studies lesson as well! 
Every good novel needs a solid beginning! Setting the stage can have your budding authors stumped, so use this lesson to get them thinking. After examining the plot rollercoaster image (included) they consider the four places their story could start: beginning, inciting incident, middle, and end. A fun aspect to this lesson is having groups secretly write beginnings to a familiar story from one of these four points. After reading them aloud, the class guesses which beginning they wrote. Writers complete a worksheet applying these ideas to their own novels.
It's all about using peer resources in this writing process lesson, which includes a fantastic novel revision worksheet packet. Learners have read a partner's story draft the night before, and groups have a "lightning round of praise" giving compliments about the novel they read. Then, writers let their inner editors out by first coming up with goals for their finished piece. By working through the packet, they come up with stylistic and content-related revisions, leaving the grammar edits for later. Finally, release the eager editors upon their drafts to revise, revise, revise!
Setting goals, career exploration, and self-awareness are three major components found on the path to college. A wide variety of wonderful teaching tools are provided to help you facilitate an understanding of how simple it can be to plan out an academic career. Planning cards, charts, activity procedures, and web links makes this a handy resource, focused on getting your class ready for college.
Presenting a distinctly environmental point of view, this expansive set of three sessions guides learners to identify home-building materials and the resources from which they are derived, and to compare materials used by region and historical context. Secondary learners explore careers involved in creating the structures that house us. Copious supporting information is included, along with a reproducible Building Materials Data Sheet.
Students explore the causes and effects of child homelessness in Turkey and around the world. They compare the issues surrounding child homelessness in poor and wealthy countries.
In small groups, teens take on different roles to discuss the qualifications for parenthood. An instruction sheet for group discussion is provided, as well as homework worksheets. Throughout these exercises, young adults take the time to consider culture, religion, race, past history, financial circumstances, support systems, and more. This is a comprehensive and poignant lesson to include in your health curriculum.
Students measure everything in their room to exact figures. They use these figures to create a to scale blueprint of their room and its furnishings. Students incorporate height measurements well as length and width and discuss how they would like to rearrange their rooms.
Ninth graders are introduced to the Prown's technique of describing various objects. As a class, they view pictures of the pyramids in Egypt and discuss how the size and shape of them show their belief in eternal life and religion. They describe them based on the Prown technique and create their own pyramids to end the instructional activity. They also complete the same steps with a Shawabti figure and another object of their choosing.
Students examine the effects of an urban setting on the development of male adolescence. After watching a film, they identify the problems in the relationship of the characters. They discuss the impact of becoming a teenage father and role play the role in different scenerios. To end the lesson, they watch a video on the changes they should except physically and mentally.
Students examine role of Naval blockades in Union war strategy, and analyze primary source image "On Deck of a Union Warship" and make detailed observation about people and activities shown.
Fourth graders determine the Great Salt Lake is a unique, thriving, and diverse ecosystem. They engage in an actual or a virtual field trip. They record field trip, whether actual or virtual, in science lab book or journal and present research projects in the form of a travel brochure.
Fourth graders examine the events that lead to the British attack on Baltimore in 1814 and the role of geography in the events of the battle. After a brief discussion on the history of trade routes before 1814 and the War of 1812, they read "By the Dawn's Early Light". Students create a time line of significant events that occurred in the book.
Fifth graders gather information about the roles, responsibilities, skills, and training and education requirements of workers. Then they input this information into a graphic organizer chart and identify the similarities and differences in the careers. Students alos analyze the information for each group member as compared to their own findings.
Seventh graders explore the geography of Eastern and Western Europe. They compare and constrast the culture of Jewish people from Eastern and Western Europe. They analyze deportation and confinement in concentration camps, using personal testimonies.

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