Charles Lindbergh Teacher Resources

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Students study the life of Charles Lindbergh, one of the 20th century's most famous men. This aviator became an American hero when he successfully crossed the Atlantic in his plane, The Spirit of St. Louis.
Students discover what the lives of Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh were really like after watching a Biography movie about them.
Robert Burleigh's book Flight: The Journey of Charles Lindbergh, about the historic trans-Atlantic solo flight in 1927, is the basis for vocabulary work here. Young readers use a word bank with six terms from the story. First they fill in the blanks in four sentences. Next comes a crossword puzzle using all six of the words. The last assignment is to write an advertisement announcing a new airline.
In this writing prompt worksheet, students learn that May 20, 1927 was the day Charles Lindbergh became the first to fly across the Atlantic Ocean alone. Students write about the bravest thing they have ever done and then explain why the action was brave.
In this reading comprehension worksheet, students read a short passage about Charles Lindbergh, then answer 4 multiple choice questions. Answers are included.
Pupils practice map skills. In this map skills lesson, students locate the cities of New York and Paris on a map. Pupils read about the flight made by Charles Lindbergh in May 1927 from New York to Paris. Students answer 8 questions about the flight.
Eleventh graders research and examine the significant individuals of the 1920s and their impact on American society. They identify characteristics of people who make a difference, and in pairs conduct research on two people with differing points of view from the 1920s. Each pair presents a dialogue performed as the two people researched.
Students research to find the location of the flight of Charles Lindbergh, and interpret its significance. They identify and analyze the changes in aeronautic technology since 1927. The lesson lists several discussion questions that can be used to provide interest or focus to the student research.
Students study the leaders of the isolationist movement within the United States and the causes of the isolationist movement, they recognize and compare the perceptions of both the isolationists within the US and those who took a more global view.
To grasp what life was like in the 1920's, middle schoolers research and role-play. Intended as a follow-up activity to a lecture on the 1920's, learners will journal, view a PowerPoint, role-play, and reflect on what they've learned. Use this activity in a history lesson or before starting a novel unit.
Students consider the role of the United States in World War II. In this World War II lesson, students examine 4 political cartoons by Dr. Seuss that feature isolationist and interventionist views on the war. Students complete the provided cartoon analysis worksheet.
Your class can learn about Amelia Earhart and practice important comprehension skills here. Learners answer questions about cause and effect, compare texts, and discuss similes and metaphors after reading Amelia Earhart: Free in the Skies by Robert Burleigh.
Students examine the Spirit of St. Louis and read about its history in the first transatlantic flight. They also analyze the life of Lindbergh with his successes and hardships. They also discuss the implications of the first transatlantic flight.
Students examine the U.S. neutrality policies that preceded American involvement in World War II. In this World War II instructional activity, students explore the events in Europe from 1939 to 1940 and Roosevelt's decision to give military aid to Britain.
Students design an interactive map with modes of transportation that actually move across the ocean. They construct transatlantic maps of the northern hemisphere and imagine what it would be like to operate various modes of transportation between North America and Europe.
Students explore social practices and technological advancement of the 1920s and 1930s and relate this to modern life. They explore the events of Amelia Earhart's life and her poetry. They write their own poetry.
Set up your writers for writing strong introductions with a formula for putting together supported thesis statements. This reference page breaks the process down and provides an example of how to compose a thesis statement, develop a projected plan, and put the to elements together to draft an introduction. After reviewing the handout, and possibly practicing together, individuals can keep this sheet for later writing assignments.
If you really want to cover the flavor of the Roaring Twenties, use this presentation. The 1920s are categorized into politics, culture, music, policy, and social issues that divided the nation. Each main header contains several subsequent slides full of great information and hyperlinks. If I were a movie critic, I'd give this one two thumbs up!
Students demonstrate the Bernoulli Principle, review the influences that affected the Wright Brothers, and make and modify paper airplanes. This amazing lesson plan has an excellent structure, and very clear plans for the students to create their planes.
A ten-lesson study of the history of flight awaits you and your charges. Learners get to do all sorts of great activities: they construct hot air baloons and scale models of the Wright Brother's Flyer, develop an understanding of the physics behind flight, and analyze data from a series of experiments using other things that fly. Outstanding!

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Charles Lindbergh