Climax Teacher Resources

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The 29 specified questions included in this resource cover the climax in Act three of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Test your students by using this activity as a reading check quiz, group work exercise, or to illicit class discussion. If given for homework, the answers can be discovered in SparkNotes or with a detailed plot summary. 
A presentation that covers everything from alliteration to trochee, use this resource as a reference or a starting point for teaching various literary terms and devices. The terms are organized in alphabetical order, making it easy to find just the one you are looking for. Showing the whole PowerPoint at once will most likely be overwhelming for your middle schoolers, so consider picking and choosing terms to show in thematic chunks.
Binoculars are used as a metaphor for good descriptive writing. Class members first view a small picture and then an enlarged view of the same image in which the details come into focus. Next, learners examine a paragraph lacking sensory details and one rich in description. Finally, class members craft their own personal narratives. Prompts, story ideas, check lists, and assessments are included in this richly detailed plan.
Use the Visual Thesaurus to predict the subject matter of Rick Riordan's book The Lightning Thief. A pre-reading activity encourages middle schoolers to use context clues and word meaning to discover what the book is about. After they finish the activity, they read the first chapter of the book and research Olympian gods.
Why just show your class a movie when you could teach them how to critique film the same way they do literature? While this lesson uses Battlestar Galactica as its visual text of choice, this plan could be used with any film selection. It would be perfect to use with the film adaptation of any literary work. Teens learn what it means to critique as well as how to identify literary and technical aspects of film as they watch various films.
Here is a widely applicable set of materials to enhance any reading task. You'll find graphic organizers, response to literature activities, writing prompts, a reading schedule, study guides, a story plot flow chart, and a character map. Resource is designated for Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, but these materials would work for any literary text, at home or in the classroom. 
The final exercise in a series of lessons about writing a novel, this resource focuses on how to begin a story. The directions are clear, examples are plentiful, and practice activities provide writers with several possible options. Whether they start at the beginning, start with an inciting incident, start in the middle of things, or start at the end, your writers will be well prepared to draft their novel or a narrative of any length.
Every good novel needs a solid beginning! Setting the stage can have your budding authors stumped, so use this lesson to get them thinking. After examining the plot rollercoaster image (included) they consider the four places their story could start: beginning, inciting incident, middle, and end. A fun aspect to this lesson is having groups secretly write beginnings to a familiar story from one of these four points. After reading them aloud, the class guesses which beginning they wrote. Writers complete a worksheet applying these ideas to their own novels.
It's all about using peer resources in this writing process lesson, which includes a fantastic novel revision worksheet packet. Learners have read a partner's story draft the night before, and groups have a "lightning round of praise" giving compliments about the novel they read. Then, writers let their inner editors out by first coming up with goals for their finished piece. By working through the packet, they come up with stylistic and content-related revisions, leaving the grammar edits for later. Finally, release the eager editors upon their drafts to revise, revise, revise!
The principles of levers and simple machines are presented here. An easy-to-make lever is constructed by each group of scientists, and they use it to explore how this simple machine makes heavy things so much easier to lift and move. A good lab sheet is embedded in the plan, as are some terrific extension activities. Fabulous!
Middle schoolers read the play "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare. In groups, they identify the instances of similes, metaphors and personification. They use the Internet to compare and contrast the events in the play with historical facts. To end the lesson plan, they hold a mock trial to examine Brutus' innocence or guilt.
Students analyze the meanings and patterns of a folk tale. They respond in their reading journals to the following prompts: How do you feel about the way "The Talking Goat" ended? Why? Which did you like better: your group's predicted ending or the actual ending? Why?
It is important for learners to have a safe place to discuss domestic violence, dating, and abuse. This discussion-based lesson provides upper graders with a list of warning signs for abuse, community resources, and ways they can help those suffering from abuse. This is a thoughtful lesson which takes the sensitivity of the topic into high consideration. Multiple handouts and community resources are included.
Thorough and all-encompassing, this study guide summarizes an entire semester, or possibly a year, of language arts vocabulary words. Vocabulary from The Diary of Anne Frank, Night, Romeo and Juliet, and various short stories is listed for review, as well as the elements of drama, stories, and literature. Concepts for MLA format and grammar finish the worksheet. Use the study guide as a way to plan your semester, substituting any stories or concepts that you cover instead.
Can technology can be addictive? After viewing a short video called "Play," class members consider this questions, gather data on types and amount of time people spend on various technology, and draw conclusions from the information gathered. The final discussion centers on the question of video games and social control.
Useful in an Of Mice and Men unit, or in a unit that focuses on descriptive writing, this lesson plan prompts young authors to impersonate John Steinbeck's writing style in the opening passages of the novel. A Six Trait writing activity guides them through the process of mimicking the sentence structure, all the way into writing their own descriptive essay about a place they know. The lesson plan provides models and rough draft guidelines.
Students hike a local mountain and examine its life zones. They measure various components at each zone and collect leaf litter at the sites. At the mountain top, students make descriptive observations and complete a handout about the four zones.
Students complete a variety of activities as they examine the historical significance of the Transcontinental Railroad and the Golden Spike Ceremony in Promontory, Utah, which honored its completion. In one activity they plan and recreate a grander, more appropriate Golden Spike ceremony.
In this biology worksheet, students complete 134 multiple choice and short answer questions in preparation for the biology final exam.
Connect a wide range of literature concepts where writers demonstrate mastery through creative writing.

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