Climax Teacher Resources

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Patricia MacLachlan's novel Sarah, Plain and Tall serves as an excellent tool for examining point of view. During reading, the class thinks about how characters feel. Just before the climax of the novel, they write friendly letters to Sarah from the point of view of Anna or Caleb. A rubric, sample letter, and optional extension activities appear at the end of this resource. 
Students discover how the history of a place or event affects one's present perceptions of that place or event. They examine the current tensions caused by the decision to make Weimar, Germany Europe's cultural capital.
Students explore the history of major American music genres. Then, through mock radio shows, students examine the distinguishing features of each genre and how each has changed throughout the years.
This lesson is designed after research done on the ecology of soil lichen in the Tucson Basin area during the summers of 1997 and 1998. Its purpose is to guide students into adopting the problem solving thinking of ecologists. The lesson encompasses all t
Students examine one writer's opinion about how different generations of Japanese citizens have been influenced by the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Students explore Holocaust survivor Simon Wiesenthal. They conduct research to examine how the post-Holocaust period has been handled historically and hold a teach-in to promote continued awareness of the Holocaust's impact.
Double click that mouse because you just found an amazing lesson! This cross-curricular Ornithology lesson incorporates literature, writing, reading informational text, data collection, scientific inquiry, Internet research, art, and technology. Wow! This resource outlines everything needed to conduct fully integrated lesson about birds
Students consider how current events are directly and intricately tied to past events, decisions and other influences. The island of Guam is used as a case study as the events of WWII have continued to affect the people of Guam today.
Students consider what they already know about the Holocaust and reflect on the sixtieth commemoration of the liberation of Auschwitz by reading and responding to testimonials of victims. They create artwork to honor those who experienced the Holocaust.
Young biologists identify how plants and animals are affected by changes in their ecosystem and environment.  The concepts of succession, maintenance of habitats, interrelationships, and adaptation are all discussed. This well-developed lesson has terrific activities and worksheets embedded in it that should make it easy to implement. An excellent lesson on biology!
High schoolers identify common elements found in folk tales and read a Togolese folk tale told by Fred Koehler. They analyze the folk tale for its elements and compare and contrast it with well-known Western folk tales.
Everyone needs to know what to expect when going through puberty. Intended for a special education class, this well developed and developmentaly appropriate resource provides a full days instruction on teaching teens with special needs about the changes that come with puberty. Transperency masters, worksheets, letter home, and several activities are included. 
Students examine the role of stories in African and African-American cultures. This lesson is written for students with visual impairments. They
What is the "Faurisson Affair”? What is “Holocaust Revisionism”? What does freedom of speech entail? Do revisionists have a right to voice their ideas? Such questions are at the heart of a richly detailed, thought provoking lesson launched by a reading of an article from the New York Times about Holocaust deniers. Everything you need, from discussion questions, to research links, from activities to extensions, is included. A powerful addition to your curriculum library.
Students explore how one uses examples from history to inform themselves of past and present events. After reading an article, they examine the significance of renaming a base in Germany after a soldier who survived the Holocaust. They create a list of places that are named after people and research the people who have places named after them.
After viewing slides and reading about child labor, young authors compose an original narrative story. They practice note-taking skills and work to effectively engage a reader by incorporating plot, logical order, complex characters, point of view, and setting. Several web links are included with this solid narrative writing lesson.
Sixth graders demonstrate comprehension of specific text by making inferences on the material and referring back to portions of the text. They use Inspiration to create a graphic organizer showing comprehension of the reading material.
Upper graders read the book Holes as a class or by themselves. In groups, they identify symbols and discuss how they are connected  among the many plots in the story. They create a timeline in which they sequence the main events to end the lesson plan. They also determine cause and effect relationships for key details in the story.
High schoolers research the events and results of the Battle of the Bulge during World War II. As a class, they discuss the role of the military in the entire European theater and write a paper describing the situations and conditions the soliders faced. They watch the clip from "The War" and compare and contrast the German and American experience in the battle.
Students examine the preparations for the invasion of France on June 6, 1944. After viewing a clip from "The War", they identify the demands and concerns of all military leaders for this invasion. They use maps to examine the geographical challenges and discuss the sacrifice of the soliders on that fateful day.

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