Climax Teacher Resources

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Learning the proper way to use a comma takes a lot of practice. Use this resource to focus on four of the main rules. Writers review using a comma (and a FANBOYS) to join two independent clauses, separate items in a series, separate adjectives, and avoid misreading. The second page houses the answers to each of the 15 practice sentences. 
Students analyze parts of a story through the sequence of actions. In this story elements lesson plan, students work in groups to read a story about a volcano and complete a worksheet on the elements within the story. Students then create second scenes that builds cumulatively through the story elements. Students present their scenes to the class.
Young scholars engage in a activity that investigates the elements that are necessary in a short story. Each element is covered separately while they take notes for each part. Then the teacher points out each element while reading a short story to the class.
High schoolers review scene structure and the elements beginning, middle and end. They view a piece of art to stimulate an idea for a improvised scene. Students work in small groups, create and then perform their scenes for the rest of the class.
Twelfth graders analyze the elements of fiction and use literary analysis vocabulary to evaluate fiction works. In this fiction analysis instructional activity, 12th graders define elements of fiction and complete a diagram for the elements.Students keep a dialectical journal for the instructional activity. Students present an analysis, and write a letter to their teacher reflecting on the assignment.
Tenth graders complete a unit of lessons on the story elements of Sherlock Holmes short stories. They analyze the plot elements, complete graphic organizers, read and discuss the plots, observe a person and take notes, and analyze an oral narration.
Students review succession charts for their native area before going to an outside site to view the changes. At the site, they follow the transect line and observe the changes in the plant life. They draw the changes on note cards that are fastened together to make flipbooks.
Ninth graders review the parts of a plot sequence for a short story. They think of a famous Disney movie and plot the events of the movie in the correct plot sequence. They do the same for a comic strip, labeling the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.
Analyzing the sequence of actions in dramatic stories leads to deeper comprehension of story structure. The class identifies the main actions in each section of a story and develops frozen tableau's for the identified actions of the story. Great for kinesthetic learners!
Help your pupils track the plot of a short story with this SMART Board activity. Using the short story "The Dinner Party" by Mona Gardner (though the lesson would work with any other short story), they define the exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution in a plot pyramid. For homework, have themwatch their favorite TV show and complete a plot pyramid.
A plot diagram helps readers visualize the structure of a story. Here’s a presentation that expands upon the traditional diagram and examines plot components (exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution) as well as types of linear plots including chronological order, flashback, and in media res arrangements. Pyramid, Aristotle’s unified plot, and Freytag’s plot structure are also featured. Consider asking your readers to diagram stories they are reading, identifying the components and types of conflict included.
Fourth graders identify and map out main stages of the story using headings. The read the introduction to the story covering the verbs and use dull verbs. Then in pairs, explore the problem facing the character in the story.
Pupils investigate the art of screenwriting and visual storytelling in this introductory instructional activity on films provided by Oregon Public Broadcasting. Emphasis is placed on the study of Mike Rich and "Finding Forrester".
Fifth graders present book reports in the form of a computer slideshow presentation. They read a book of their choice, identify the setting, character traits, conflict, plot, resolution, and favorite parts, and create a PowerPoint presentation to present this information.
Second graders assimilate information about the origins and purpose of folktales as stories that informed and entertained people around the world. They determine how and why the folktales were handed down and how they changed from country to country. Also, they complete a homograph worksheet. Finally, they work with a partner to invent and present an object that has magical powers.
Seventh graders examine the internal and external conflicts that Jonas faces in "The Giver" in an essay. Students use SMART Board and Inspiration to organize their ideas graphically before combining them into their paper.
First graders compare two versions of The 3 Little Pigs. They identify the main characters in the two stories, identify the plot of the two stories and explain the climax and the endings of the two stories. They use a Venn Diagram to make comparisons.
Students examine a selected story/book and practice identifying the setting, characterization, and plot. As a class, they identify problems in the story, turning points and the climax. They use a rubric to evaluate the story, as well.
Students gain an understanding of the literary elements of fairy tales. They compose fairy tales using graphic web organizers and presentation software. The presentations must include six frames; a title frame, an illustration of fairy tale elements, illustrations and explanations of their tale's beginning, middle, climax, and resoulution.
Students identify various inventions and their inventors. As a class, they compare and contrast the Industrial Age with the Information Age and determine the difference between inventions, adaptations and discoveries. They discuss how the invention of the computer is leading us into an even more deeper Information Age.

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