Cobra Teacher Resources

Find Cobra educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 102 resources
Groups or pairs choose ordinary objects from a bag and rename them based on traits, so that a stapler becomes a "paper cobra." Then they connect this exercise to the way authors use language to emphasize certain traits through word choice. They record and explain special or unfamiliar words while reading from the verse novel Keeping the Night Watch by Hope Anita Smith. You can get the worksheets by registering for free with Readworks.org. 
Young scholars discover how helicopters work through an interactive program. They also examine why helicopters are more difficult to fly than airplanes. They discover the history of the helicopter and how it has been used in military operations.
Students participate in a host of activities designed to encourage creativity, collaboration, and cooperation. They experience walking in different ways, greeting various types of people, and mirroring, where one student duplicates the movements of the other. Other activities include the French telephone, the magnet, glass cobra, name trains, and mood sculptures.
Students write and draw about their knowledge of reptiles. For this reptiles lesson plan, students view a nature video focusing on lizards and snakes. They complete a chart comparing and contrasting lizards and snakes. They then focus on defense mechanisms that they learned from the video and compile a list of strategies of defense. And last they write a summary about one of the snakes or lizards as an assessment.
Original and cross-curricular, this reproducible graph comes with a chronological list of 19 events from Jerry Spinelli's novel as "data." Readers plot each one on a scale of 1-10 to show how happy Maniac is at those moments in the story. Completed graphs allow the class to chart, visualize, and track changes in Maniac's mood over the course of the book.
For this language arts worksheet, 5th graders read the passages for the language test and answer multiple choice questions about them. Students read 5 passages and answer 21 questions.
Use these questions to test your pupils' comprehension of the short story "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" by Rudyard Kipling. Assign these ten questions as-is and have your class use computers to respond to the questions and receive instant feedback, or copy the questions over to another document and give each individual a hard copy.
Students follow directions to make a snake out of patterns. They research a specific snake and present it to the class in a group. They listen to a presentation about the King Cobra snake prepared by the teacher.
Show your pupils how to use guiding questions to help them focus their research into a topic. Using the framework provided by these questions, researchers explore a topic, collect interesting facts, and prepare a PowerPoint presentation on their topic.
Students compare and contrast snakes and turtles, then fill out an information sheet.
Students explore biology by completing a research project on a specific animal. In this reptile research activity, students discuss the characteristics that classify an animal as a reptile and view video clips of reptiles in action. Students create a Venn diagram comparing snakes and lizards and write a summary about a chosen reptile.
Students explore literary elements. In this Rise of the Golden Cobra lesson plan, students participate in prereading, reading, and post reading activities regarding the historical fiction novel by Henry T. Aubin.
Teacher guides are wonderful tools with tons of ideas that help you relate content in many different ways. Using the high-interest book, Who Would Win? Killer Whale vs. Great White Shark, learners will hone their discussion and reading comprehension skills. Included are vocabulary and comprehension worksheets as well as several wonderful teaching ideas and discussion questions related to the text. Teaching strategies include, compare and contrast, paired reading, critical thinking, and ways to connect text to four other subject areas. Note: I read this book with my first graders and they loved it!
Let the synthesizing begin as your learners trace and explore thematic ideas through informational and literary texts that concern Ramses II and the fall of Saddam Hussein. Learners begin by examining an encyclopedia article concerning Ramses and progress to “Ozymandias” by Shelly, and an article from National Geographic of the same topic but of a different tone. Readers compare the three texts and finalize the persona of Ramses. They also develop a theme from the three texts. Learners connect the themes through a photograph of the fall of Saddam Hussein’s statue in a Bagdad city square. From that, they analyze hubris of the leaders.  Everyone in the class is challenged with argument and synthesis essays. 
Learners study South America's Itaipu Dam and Power Plant in order to gain an understanding that hydroelectric power is a major means of generating electricity throughout the world. They also look into the environmental impacts that these types of power plants have on the environment and the animals who live there. This very impressive, 24-page plan is chock-full of terrific activities, worksheets, maps, websites, and an assessment. Very good!
Are you thinking about taking your class to the local zoo? Kids of all ages love visiting exotic animals in order to learn about biodiversity, habitat, and animal adaptations. Here is a 44-page activity guide that provides educators with a wide variety of pre-trip activities intended to enhance the overall field trip experience. Each activity is hands on and involves reading, research, creative thinking, and collaboration to facilitate interest and a deeper understanding of the curriculum. For example, one activity provides children with the opportunity to create a cheetah diorama.
“Rikki-tikki-tavi” provides an opportunity to model for readers how to use background information to enrich understanding of a story. Class members observe animal behavior, listen to biographical background on Rudyard Kipling, study vocabulary words, and examine pictures of cobras, mongeese, and muskrats. Finally, they read the story. The motto for this lesson is: read and find out.
Online activities make learning about wetland biodiversity interactive! First, ecologists navigate through National Geographic's 56-page "GeoStory" about US wetland ecosystems. They use the FieldScope tool to investigate the Barataria Preserve in Louisiana and predict where assigned species might make their homes. Vocabulary, background information, links to websites, and templates for handouts make this a comprehensive resource to use in your life science class.
Yoga is a wonderful form of exercise. Here, pupils engage in two creative movement exercises. They make two yoga poses; the cat and the tree. The cat is actually sometimes known as the cobra in yoga terms. Both of these movements will feel really good to your kids when they need a stretch. Some kids may have more success with the tree pose if they are leaning against a wall. This is based on the Arthur episode, "DW Flips."
These 18 questions for Part One of Fahrenheit 451 assess the basic understanding of the characters and their interactions within the plot. Only recall questions are provided. 

Browse by Subject


Cobra