Cold War Terrorism Teacher Resources

Find Cold War Terrorism educational ideas and activities

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When and how did the Cold War begin? To answer this question, you will not find a better-organized, in-depth, activity- and inquiry-based resource than this! Executing best teaching practices throughout, each portion of this inquiry involves detailed analysis of primary and secondary source material, supporting learners as they develop an answer to the resource's guiding question.
Students participate in a news conference simulation. In this Cold War lesson, students research events of the conflict during Eisenhower's presidency and use the information to script and participate in a news conference with Eisenhower.
Students research the positions of civil defense and nuclear disarmament during the Cold War era. They participate in a class debate to support a given position.
Students examine the causes and the Korean War. In this Cold War lesson, students discover how the United States became involved in the Korean War and determine how it became a "flashpoint" in the Cold War. Students complete a worksheet activity.
Students study of the effects of the Cold War on the home front. They analyze the film High Noon according to an abbreviated version of the standards that films were judged by in the early 1950s and determine whether or not High Noon is "fit" to be released to the American public.
Eleventh graders are introduced to the events between the years 1949 and 1989. They list and explain key events and people that contributed to the development of the Cold War. Students are asked "what do you think Billy Joel meant by 'We didn't start the fire', and why do you think this has historical relevance, or does it?"
Students examine the Cold War and the War on Terror. In this American history lesson, students research print and nonprint resources regarding both wars. Student compare the experiences of youth at the time so both the Cold War and War on Terror in essays that they write.
High schoolers view examples of political advertisements during the years of 1952 through 1964. After viewing, they discuss how the Cold War and the threat of Communism affected the development of the United States. They compare the Cold War to the war on Terrorism being fought today.
Students determine who is responsible for the start of the Cold War. For this Cold War lesson, students conduct their own research about the evolution of the war and write essays that reveal their opinion on how the war began.
Students study how the map of Europe changed as a result of the Treaty of Versailles at the end of World War I. They examine the results of the end of the Cold War.
This unit introduces students to the modern history of Cambodia in the context of the Cold War. It examines the relationship between Cambodia and Vietnam and the US and other Western capatilistic countries.
Foster discussion in your advanced high school history class with primary sources from the Vietnam War era. After a timeline activity involving manipulatives, pupils get down to business analyzing and categorizing the document set. All of this work is in preparation for a fish bowl discussion and timed essay.
In this lesson, students explore the history, relevance and current application of international tribunals for war crimes. Students look at cases from the Nuremberg trials, Tokyo trials and the Bosnian War.
Students create Venn diagrams comparing and contrasting the Vietnam and Iraq wars. They write informed letters to their senators expressing their opinions and possible solutions to the war. They also create mock bumper stickers displaying their views about the war in Iraq as either Democrats or Republicans.
If you are planning a unit on military history that includes a comparison between the Vietnam War and the Iraq War, this resource may be useful. It lists possible sources for pupils to use to complete the graphic organizer which prepares them for a debate. While the document is dated (2007), it remains relevant. This does not include a rubric or assessment, nor does it explain the procedures for conducting a class debate. 
Students explore the history, rationale and ethics of civilian bombing in times of war. They consider war strategy, the laws and conventions of war and international implications.
Students examine the implication of civilian targets in war. In this World War II lesson, students investigate the history of bombing practices in war. Students zero in on World War II bombing practices as they discuss precision and area bombing as well as atomic bombs. Students participate in a classroom activity that requires them to role play nations in attendance at a new Hague Convention.
What kinds of human activity do we define as "warlike"? Middle and high schoolers examine various definitions of war and types of warfare, especially as these descriptions relate to the kinds of war we are witnessing at the beginning of the twenty-first century. In pairs, they work on a worksheet which helps facilitate class discussion.
Students investigate the history of the law of war. In this international law lesson, students listen to a lecture regarding the history of international law spanning from Pax Romana to Collective Security. Students respond to discussion questions and collaborate to write international law recommendations for the 21st century.
Students view the film Fog of War and discuss the most striking elements of the film. They focus on chosen lessons from robert McNamara's life such as: empathy, rationality and proportionality.

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