Czech Republic Teacher Resources

Find Czech Republic educational ideas and activities

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In this Czech Republic worksheet, students explore and investigate facts about the Czech Republic in order to answer the fourteen questions asked.
Students create nature journals of imaginary trips to the Czech Republic. Included in their reports are information and descriptions of the landscape, climate, animals, plants, and elements to create a realistic impression. From the Internet, students print pictures and use them as photos they took themselves during their trip.
Young scholars discuss the Genesee River and they describe the different things they might see on its shore. They are asked to name different activities people do around the river. Students related the Genesee to the Moldau, they are told a story by using listening maps. They guess how the instruments might suggest what is on the maps.
This short biography of Antonin Dvorak and map of Eastern Europe could accompany and supplement listening to "Slavonic Dance No. 7." Four questions support reading the geographic map, a "Listening Map" outlines the form of the composition, and dot-to-dot and matching make for fun sponge activities. Lively graphics make this a highly reader-friendly reproducible.
In this blank Czech Republic outline map worksheet, students study the physical boundaries of the country. This outline map may be used for a variety of geographic activities.
Ninth graders explore why people visit Prague. In this Czech Republic lesson, 9th graders read an article and answer guided questions. Students participate in a spelling test on new vocabulary.  
Learners, in groups, create timelines reflecting major events in Czech Republic history. Their timelines include dates and explanations of the events. to aid in the explanations, students may include pictures. Using poster board, they display their timelines in the classroom.
In this Ukraine gas crisis worksheet, students read the article, answer true and false questions, complete synonym matching, complete phrase matching, complete a gap fill, answer short answer questions, answer discussion questions, write, and more about the Ukraine gas crises. Students complete 10 activities total.
Eleventh graders role play as participants in a NATO meeting focused on inviting a number of independent republics from the former Soviet Union to become members of NATO. They represent their countries after researching them.
In this U.S. missile shield worksheet, students read the article, answer true and false questions, complete synonym matching, complete phrase matching, complete a gap fill, answer short answer questions, answer discussion questions, write, and more about the U.S. missile shield. Students complete 10 activities total.
Students write fictitious letters from pen pals in the Czech Republic. The letters explain what daily life might be for a Czech student. In addition to information about food, sports, and arts, students also include information about cultural events.
Students create posters describing the economy of the Czech Republic. Included on the posters are facts about major industries, agricultural products, and export commodities. Students, in groups, use both text and pictures to augment their posters.
Students identify the pros and cons of the Czech republics membership in the European Union. In pairs, representing both sides of the issue, they debate its participation in the Union. Students develop presentations and debate the issue.
Explore the food chains that support Arctic ecosystems. A class discussion on interdependence and the different roles plants and animals play in ecosystems provides students with the knowledge to complete a worksheet asking them to create food chains involving a variety of Arctic life. To further engage students in the lesson, consider assigning each child an Arctic plant or animal and having the class arrange and rearrange themselves into food chains. This resource would fit perfectly into a unit investigating the different types of ecosystems found around the world.
From days of 24 hour sunlight, to endless nights that last for days, the Arctic is a very unique place to live. Examine the seasonal changes that occur in the northern-most reaches of the globe and the impact they have on the plants and animals living there. The included worksheet offers a number of different opportunities for learners to demonstrate their understanding of this unique region. This instructional activity would fit nicely in either a unit on ecosystems or weather and climate in an upper-elementary science class.
Within these guidelines for a comparative government project, you'll find some very useful worksheets that support learners in breaking down demographic, economic, and political information regarding each of their chosen countries and respective governments. 
In this episode of Crash Course World History, John Green does an excellent job summarizing the reasons behind the ideological clash between the United States and the Soviet Union in the Cold War. Covering early features of the war such as the Marshall Plan and the policy of containment, Green goes on to explore US efforts around the globe to stop the spread of communism, and the lasting implications of those endeavors. Tip: Consider pausing at 2:00 to discuss the magnitude of Green's statement.
What is the purpose of the European Union, and what institutions and countries comprise it? Check out this resource in which class members participate in a student-led WebQuest activity designed to offer an overview of the European Union. They will then work in groups to design travel brochures on assigned countries from the European Union.
Learn about life in the Arctic while practicing how to graph and interpret data with this interdisciplinary lesson. Starting with a whole group data-gathering exercise, students are then given a worksheet on which they analyze and create bar and pie graphs involving information about Arctic animals. This lesson is perfect for tying together a math unit on representing data and a science exploration of Arctic ecosystems. 
Investigate the properties of three-dimensional figures with this Arctic-themed math instructional activity. Beginning with a class discussion about different types of solid figures present in the classroom, young mathematicians are then given a two-sided worksheet asking them to draw 3-D shapes, identify their parts, and create cubes from a series of nets. Though the instructional activity does not provide any detailed information about the Arctic, it is does provide a fun change of pace to a geometry unit in the upper-elementary grades.