Dance Teacher Resources

Find Dance educational ideas and activities

Showing 41 - 60 of 6,349 resources
Students share dance moves that reflect their personalities or depict how they are feeling, explore popularity of recreational and competitive social dancing by reading and discussing the article "Follow the Flying Feet," present examples of social dancing, research dance forms performed in class, and reflect on which dance styles they like best.
Learners dance the image of falling snow. They move, swing, fall, and rise to music working to depict snow falling, the sun, and high/low movements. This is a well-thought out lesson that aids them in seeing movement as a form of expression. 
Students discuss dance elements and create a dance map. They choose a dance theme and incorporate movement into their dance maps and choreography. They also experiment with different types of music.
Students study weather and focus on specific dance concepts. They are introduced to different ty es of clouds and how they are formed. Next, they study wind and why it occurs.
First graders show word meaning through movement. In this word meaning lesson, 1st graders participate in a "Brain Dance" to begin the lesson. They listen as the teacher reads a book and acts out words to show meaning such as tumbling when they hear "tumble down." They work in quartets as they complete the activity numerous times.
Get those boys dancing! Here's a dance activity that is choreographed around the use of a basketball. Teach them this line dance and see how they do. Watch the provided video yourself, or better yet, use the video to teach this dance. You could also have the class make suggestions to change up the dance or perhaps let them choreograph a dance with a partner using the basketball. Hopefully, this will help increase participation from more of the boys in your class.
Students create a dance based on animal movements. In this kinesthetic lesson plan, the students will read and imitate animals in a creative way and share their dances with the group. The lesson includes a take-home activity and a math curriculum connection.
This line dance incorporates the grapevine, step-claps, the Twist, and the Lindy step. It's a great way to introduce the Lindy step in a line dance before teaching them to dance the Lindy with a partner. The directions are well written and explain the dance step-by-step. Suggested songs for this dance are "Lollipop" or "Rock Around the Clock". 
Students explore colors through storytelling and dance. In this visual arts lesson, students view the painting "Bird and Cornstalk Rug" and identify three colors. Students express how the colors make them feel through the rhythm of percussion instruments. Students also use movement to express their emotions they get from the colors.
There are really only four basic moves in this line dance. Those dance moves are: grapevine, slide, marching, and then dipping and clapping. Each 8-count is repeated twice, for a total of a 64-count dance. The unique addition to this dance is that alternating rows begin the dance in opposite directions. Odd rows start to the right, even rows start to the left. Watch the video and see how this looks.
Here's a 32-count, get-up-and-move line dance done to "A Girl Like Me" by Rihanna. Move left, move right, step kick, clap, pivot and turn. These are some of the moves in this line dance. Make adjustment according to what you learners can do. Watch the video, or use it to teach your classes this fast-paced dance. You can see in the video that some of the dancers put their own style into their performance. Encourage your learners to express themselves as well!
High schoolers investigate the process and components present in a dance composition. They create their own composition for the purpose of recreating all he elements of a dance composition. The dance is written in a journal for the purpose of reference and reflection.
Students go through the experience of creating a dance. They use the correct vocabulary when creating the dance in writing. Students choreograph the steps needed to perform the dance in sequence. Then they perform the dance for final assessment.
Students explore how dance can invoke the significance of experiences in their everyday lives. They work in small dance troupes to create their own dance pieces reflecting themes and experiences relevant to their lives.
Fourth graders create dances through a randomly generated process (such as throwing a dice) and perform their dances for the class. Class work is based on Merce Cunningham's "Chance Dance" and includes walking, skipping hopping, and other movements.
Young scholars are introduced to the various career opportunities in dance. Using the internet, they research the educational requirements and starting salaries. They write a paper on the information they collected and share their statistics with the class.
Students create a dance that incorporates the use of angles with their bodies. In this angles and dance lesson plan, students incorporate math into body movements.
Fifth graders dance in different ways to show movement of states of matter. In this matter lesson plan, 5th graders make connected shapes with a partner, make flowing movements, travel rapidly, and more. 
In this fiction books worksheet, students complete seven multiple choice questions about the book, "Loves Music, Loves To Dance." These questions contain concepts such as choosing the correct author, who published the book, when it was on the New York Times best seller list, and more.
Learners compare and contrast the basic vocabulary of ballet, modern, and jazz dance through observation and experience. This lesson correlates with the DanceSense Enhanced DVD.