Date Rape or Violence Teacher Resources

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Students Define date rape. they Explain why date rape happens and List how you can avoid date rape. they research what you can do if you are attacked and how you can help someone who has been raped.
Young scholars examine the cycle of violence: child abuse, date rape and why women stay in violent relationships. They identify characteristics of abusers and victims, identify the parts of the violence cycle and explain the cycle by using examples to illustrate how the cycle promotes abuse.
Students define and examine the dynamics of domestic violence. They participate in two simulations, discuss song lyrics, define the role of the media, and complete a writing exercise.
A series of activities help middle- and high-schoolers identify and explore gender stereotypes and how they can lead to violence and abuse. Use think-pair-share to activate whole class brainstorming about what it means to "be a man" and "be ladylike." Role play exercises demonstrate how the interplay of stereotypes can lead to violence and abuse, and how to participate in respectful conflict resolution.
It is important for students to have a safe place to discuss domestic violence, dating, and abuse. This discussion-based lesson provides upper graders with a list of warning signs for abuse, community resources, and ways they can help those suffering from abuse. This is a thoughtful lesson which takes the sensitivity of the topic into high consideration. Multiple handouts and community resources are included.
Students are introduced to the characteristics of rape. As a class, they identify statements as either facts or myths about rape. In groups, they complete a survey to identify their own perceptions about rape and compare them with other classmates. They develop their own responses if they are threatened by a rapist and determine the emotional needs of a victim to end the lesson.
Students define domestic violence. They identify the signs of abusive relationships, determine community resources, identify what a healthy relationship is. and discover facts about teen dating violence. They increase awareness about the glorification of violence in the media.
Students take a closer look at domestic violence. In this family law lesson, students participate in a classroom simulation that requires them to define domestic violence and students then discuss teen dating violence. Students make note of community resources that support victims in abusive relationships.
Young scholars explore domestic violence and the many causes of it.
High schoolers examine domestic violence issues. For this global studies lesson, students read a case study on domestic violence. High schoolers take notes on the case and respond to discussion questions.
Learn about film and TV ratings systems in Canada (includes a comparison to the MPAA system) and how they influence appropriate viewing for youths. A detailed commentary about the film Seven pointed at revealing flaws in ratings systems and an article making a cause-and-effect connection between violence warnings and teen viewing both reflect the resource publication date. Easy to update with more current texts; the objectives are still relevant.
Young scholars research the warning signs and statistics regarding dating violence. They watch and take notes for the PBS video "Twisted Love: Dating Violence Exposed," conduct Internet research, and in small groups present their information to the class in the form of an oral presentation.
Students read about human behavior by completing a worksheet in class. In this sexual activity lesson, students identify the importance about consenting to sexual behavior as opposed to being forced into it or being exploited. Students answer behavior study questions before completing a life science worksheet.
Eleventh graders identify characteristics of dating relationships that are healthy, unhealthy, or abusive. Students investigate how to deal with conflicts that are part of any relationship and to take the proactive measures required to sustaining healthy relationships. These activities may be followed up by a service learning project.
Eleventh graders analyze the violence of media and advertising on women, as well as Gandhi's views of women. In this women and media lesson, 11th graders Killing Us Softly and Tough Guise as an analysis of media and advertising and their messages about women. Students explore Gandhi's view of women and write a letter to a media or advertising agency outlining the harmful effects of their use of objectification and stereotypes on society.
How do media representations influence our attitudes? Examining advertisements through the filter of gender representation forms the basis of this, the second of three lessons that address gender stereotypes. Resources include links, handouts, and overheads.
Students examine popular misconceptions about sexual activity among teens. They read a handout and assess their own knowledge of facts by answering true or false questions, and participate in a class discussion about the results of the "sex myths" handout.
Students investigate personal health by answering a list of study questions. In this sexual assault lesson, students identify the types of situations which may lead to exploitation, assault or rape and discuss ways to limit their contact with these situations. Students read text discussing what to do if you are attacked by a sexual predator and what to do after an attack has ended.
Young scholars watch a varietry of films showing college life. In groups, they take different scenerios from the films and determine how they would have reacted. As a class, they discuss more in depth the issues they might face in college. To end the lesson, they research the life and works of Spike Lee and John Singleton.
Students attempt to answer how African-American, Latino, and white students address race relations in the United States in the future.

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