Declaration of Independence Teacher Resources

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Students can delve into how Thomas Jefferson's words in the Declaration of Independence changed history.
“Was the writing of the Declaration of Independence an inevitable event?”  Class members tackle this question as they read online chapter 1 of Carl Becker’s The Declaration of Independence: A Study on the History of Ideas. Then, after examining the rhetorical organization of this famous document, individuals adopt the same structure and craft their own declaration of independence.
Students assess the role of the Declartion of Independence in the development of the American Revolution. They examine the role of the Declaration of Independence as part of the American identity. Students analyze the argumentative structure of the Declaration of Independence.
Students reflect on the Declaration of Independence.  In this U.S. History lesson, students read the Declaration of Independence then complete an activity and worksheet on the topic.
Students review the Declaration of Independence through the eyes of two historians. In this Declaration of Independence activity, students view the Declaration of Independence Preamble and discuss the points of view of historians. Students complete a worksheet relative to the points of view.
Explore the Declaration of Independence in this US History lesson. Middle schoolers compare and contrast viewpoints of the Loyalists and the Patriots as they discuss the issue of colonial independence from Britain. They present support for both groups using a debate format, and then they come to a consensus about how the signing of the Declaration of Independence was a positive step in US history.
Budding historians read six documents related to grievances that led to the writing of the Declaration of Independence. They then craft an essay in which they discuss the perspective of both the colonists and the king. This DBQ could be used as a practice test for the US History AP exam. 
Fifth graders participate in a discussion about the Declaration of Independence.  In this Declaration of Independence lesson, 5th graders write imaginary stories in the voice of a member of the committee at Independence hall. Students answer questions as the committee member.
Learners analyze the Declaration of Independence. They identify and describe various sections of the document then discuss how the colonists responded to it. As a culminating activity, they write their own declarations of independence as if they we were under the rule of harsh authorities. While the link provided for the document analysis worksheet is not functioning, the sheet is attached on the final page of the packet. 
Students identify and examine the Declaration of Independence and ascertain its true intent and its eventual realization. Then they analyze the Declaration of Independence and summarize the intentions of the Declaration. Students also evaluate the degree to which public policies and citizen behaviors reflect or foster the stated ideals of a democratic republican form of government.
Students examine the Declaration of Independence. For this colonial America lesson, students read literature regarding the document as well as excerpts of the document itself. Students also perform a Reader's Theatre script based on the signing of the document.
Young scholars study the Declaration of Independence and the process our founding fathers went through to get it written and signed. They analyze other similar historical documents and draft and present their own declarations.
Tenth graders research the Declaration of Independence and its impact. They assemble puzzle pieces of the declaration and create their own declaration of independence including grievances and resolution.
Middle schoolers identify and interpret the Declaration of Independence and the rights and privileges demanded in the document. They also identify how those rights and privileges have affected our history. Students then research about the reluctant author of it, Thomas Jefferson, and prepare an oral report paraphrasing an excerpt of the Declaration of Independence.
Students research philanthropists of the American Revolution. In this philanthropy lesson, students watch the video Johnny Tremain and analyze the characters and determine their motives. Students read the Declaration of Independence and discuss how citizens can act as philanthropists because of it. Students research the men who signed the Declaration of Independence.
Students examine readings and symbols to learn about the War of Independence and Thomas Jefferson. In this War of Independence lesson, students explore the role of Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration for Independence. Students answer questions and analyze symbols.
Students conduct inquiries and research-acquiring, organizing, analyzing, interpreting, evaluating, and communicating facts, themes, and general principles operating in American history. They use the Declaration of Independence to formulate the historical question: What should I expect to see in a constitutional government according to the standards set forth in the US Declaration of Independence.
Twelfth graders take a closer look at the signing of the Declaration of Independence. In this American Revolution lesson plan, 12th graders discuss the meaning of the document as well as the risk involved in signing it. Students then research information about each of the signers and then role play a discussion that may have taken place among the signers.
Young scholars discover how the Declaration of Independence transformed from a draft to a treasured historical document. In this Declaration of Independence lesson, students discuss the context in which Jefferson wrote the document and analyze its meaning.
Fifth graders discuss two documents written by Thomas Jefferson. In this Thomas Jefferson lesson, 5th graders analyze the preamble to the Declaration of Independence and a run away slave ad. They participate in a Socratic seminar in which they discuss the documents respectfully with one another. 

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Declaration of Independence