Disorders Teacher Resources

Find Disorders educational ideas and activities

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Students examine how various media messages impact health. They research various eating disorders analyze how media messages can play a part in the development of these disorders, and write short reports.
Learners take a closer look at eating disorders. In this personal health lesson plan, students research common eating disorders, investigate treatments for the disorders, and make presentations that highlight their findings. 
Students read and interpret handout about sleeping habits and disorders, and plan and create classroom bulletin board that displays causes, disorders and effects of sleep deprivation.
Sixth graders examine how the media has an impact on poor body image and eating disorders among young people.  In this body image lesson, 6th graders discover the unrealistic values media promotes. Students explore the mental, physical and social benefits of healthy dietary and fitness habits then work in groups to create a collage depicting criteria that judges attractiveness.
High schoolers read and answer questions on neural processing and the Pinocchio Illusion. They relate and discuss these topics in conjunction with body-image disorders such as anorexia and bulimia . This instructional activity include video extension activities.
Young scholars read an article describing a controversial new theory for treating anorexia nervosa, research other eating disorders, simulate case studies and suggest possible treatment for these cases.
Sixth graders study the concept of dysfuctional eating including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, fad dieting, and having an unbalanced diet. They watch and discuss videos about eating disorders and then they write a paper on how to make their favorite snack.
Eighth graders research types of eating disorders and create a PowerPoint presentation.
Students define various mental disorders and list some of their signs and symptoms. They identify mental disorders after being given hypothetical scenarios. They share their results with the class.
Special needs students practice completing everyday tasks such as organizing a day plan, reading a clock and completing simple math problems. They define the proper learning techniques for their disorder and utilize props in learning environments.
Students investigate the digestive system and the excretory system. In this biology lesson, students discuss healthy eating habits, diet and weight. They differentiate between an eating disorder and good eating habits.
Sixth graders create a collage of attractive people. They write about what makes these people attractive. They discuss what makes someone attractive. They research eating disorders and how the media impacts what people deem as attractive.
In this nervous system instructional activity, students use the internet to research 4 nervous system disorders. Students write down the cause, symptoms, and treatments for each disorder researched. This instructional activity is a graphic organizer.
In this eating disorders learning exercise, students use drawings or photos from magazines to design an ad for jeans. They use realistic body types and positive messages about body image and types. They answer 2 questions about who they target with their ad and how their ad may influence people's behavior and thoughts about body image.
Students discuss the nature of mental disorders. They research what abnormal behavior is and the perspectives of psychological disorders. Students practice diagnosing cases from the DSM-IV casebook.
Create journal entries and basic internet searches to show that they know basic computer skills. Children diagnosed with emotional or behavioral disorders demonstrate computer skills such as typing and following directions.
In this tracking media advertisements about eating disorders instructional activity, students observe and record magazine titles and their covers and observe advertised products and record descriptions of the ads. Students write nine short answers.
Explore the idea of self-esteem through different mediums. Research what is needed for increased self-esteem: list three things one might do well in, take a photo of an activity where each student is performing well, and examine how the media affects the ways pupils see each other. Additionally, create a class book of what each student does well in or with and write a letter telling someone how the media views projects unrealistic image of beauty.
While primarily based on his research regarding autism in early childhood, award-winning researcher Ami Klin also offers great insight into how our brains develop from birth and discusses the necessity of social interaction early in life. Klin provides an overview of key points relating to the brain disorder of autism, new technologies based on eye-tracking, and the process of discovering how newborns engage with the world. He concludes by declaring a bio-ethical imperative for early intervention and treatment before behaviors associated with autism emerge in the second year of life. 
"With the declining numbers of bees, the cost of over 130 fruit and vegetable crops that we rely on for food is going up in price." While scientist Noah Wilson-Rich uses the plight of honey bees as the main focus of his presentation, this is actually a great resource to begin a discussion on what the future holds for urban agriculture. The presenter discusses a range of topics, from an overview of pollination and the challenges of habitat loss to the surprisingly higher yield of honey bees in urban areas as compared with rural locations.