Division Inverse Relationship Teacher Resources

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Sixth graders practice creating and solving number sentences on a calculator. They interact with number facts, their properties, algorithms and estimation. Each student recognizes inverse relationships of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.
Second graders explore related multiplication and division facts. They study the inverse relationship of multiplication and division and engage in a group discussion about families. They complete a web-based lesson which is imbedded in this plan.
Help the class determine missing factors in equations by creating arrays. Through modeling and practice, they come to see the inverse relationship between multiplication and division. As an assessment, individuals build their own array and write corresponding equations.
In this inverse relationships involving multiplication and division instructional activity, students problem solve and calculate the answers to sixteen mathematical equations.
In this math worksheet, students discover inverse relationships in multiplication and division. Students complete 20 problems, which are worded like this: since 7x5=35, then 35 divided by 7 = ____. All problems involve basic math facts through the 12s.
For this inverse relationships worksheet, students use information given to fill in blank boxes to show the inverse relationship between division and multiplication problems.
In this inverse relationship worksheet, students use information given to fill in blank boxes, showing the inverse relationship between division and multiplication problems.
In this inverse relationship worksheet, learners use given information to fill in missing numbers in boxes to show the inverse relationship between a division and multiplication problem.
In this inverse relationship learning exercise, students use given information to fill in missing numbers in boxes to show the inverse relationship between a division and multiplication problem.
In this multiplication and division inverse operations activity, students fill in the blanks in 16 multiplication and division sentences with the appropriate numbers based on inverse relationships.
In this inverse relationships worksheet, 4th graders use the given numbers in the multiplication and division sentences to find the missing numbers in the 16 inverse relationships.
In this inverse relationships review worksheet, students use their math skills to solve 16 problems that require them to fill in the boxes with the appropriate numbers.
In this inverse relationships review worksheet, students use their math skills to solve 16 problems that require them to fill in the boxes with the appropriate numbers.
Third graders study inverse relationships in both mathematics and their everyday world. The students show how to "undo" an action. Students use that knowledge to investigate how addition and subtraction "undo" each other. This demonstrates mastery of the objectives.
The inverse relationship between multiplication and division guides young mathematicians as they explore the properties of 1 and 0 in the fifth video of this series. Real-world contexts are presented with the help of visual models that clearly explain these special properties of division. The lesson plan concludes with a summary of four simple rules for young mathematicians to remember when solving division problems. This resource will nicely supplement an introductory unit on division, either as a whole class or independent learning activity.
Students fold paper to form a house, then use three numbers to make fact families for their houses. They write a family of multiplication and division facts on a piece of paper cut in the shape of a house.
The relationship between multiplication and division is explained with a touch of humor in the third of five videos on understanding properties of operations. Scaffolding begins the lesson plan with a review of the relationship between addition and subtraction and an explanation of how this is different for dividing and multiplying. A thorough and well-illustrated discussion follows as the inverse relationship between these two operations is explained.
Don't lose your marbles! This simple story problem helps make teaching division with fractions much easier. Work on this problem along with the lesson titled, How Many Servings of Oatmeal? to highlight the difference between the two versions of division. Context provides a great opportunity to discuss the inverse relationship between multiplication and division, smoothly transitioning into explicit instruction about the steps to dividing fractions. 
Third graders use pennies as manipulatives to solve simple division problems. They create division number sentences to correspond with each exercise. This is a good, hands-on way to teach the concept of division.
Students solve one step equations. For this algebra lesson, students solve linear equations using division, multiplication, subtraction and addition. They investigate the correct way to keep an equation balanced.

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Division Inverse Relationship