Dolores Huerta Teacher Resources

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Students examine the life of Dolores Huerta and her contributions to the development of labor unions. They read the book "Cesar Chavez: Triumph of Spirit," and in groups create a quiz, complete a Venn diagram, listen to a guest speaker, and write journal entries.
Students are able to answer research questions through internet research. They write a bridf history of the UFW using research. Students are able to create resumes of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta by researching their biography.
Students are able to analyze speeches and articles by outlining their content. They are able to create a list of dominant themes used in speech and article writing through class discussion and participation.
“Humanscape No.65” by Melesia Casas and Ester Hernandez’s “Sun Maid Raisins” launch a study of how works of art can advocate for social change. After examining these two works and discussing the human rights issues raised, class members are encouraged to create their own advocacy graphic. Learning links, reflections, service opportunities, and worksheets are included in the richly detailed plan. 
Fourth graders research Hispanic child labor in California's agricultural period. They create dioramas reflecting the lives of migrant farm workers and political cartoons as produce crate labels, They illustrate farm scenes and hold a gallery tour.
In this Cesar Chavez worksheet, students read about the life of Cesar Chavez, then complete a variety of comprehension activities: a synonym match, phrase match, fill-in-the-blanks, spelling and sequencing. Homework suggestions are given.
Fourth graders examine the agriculture explosion in California in the late 1800's to the early 1930's. They analyze primary source material putting themselves into the shoes of a child laborer. They also gain an understanding of different cultures.
Students research the role of Latino Philanthropists. They examine the farm labor movement which started Latino activism. They find examples of good character and civic virtue within the Latino population.
Make connections between Esperanza Rising and human rights with the activities outlined here. The lesson starts out with a brief quiz and review of the novel. After that, pupils circulate and share quote strips that you give to them. The goal is to match quotes from the novel with quotes about human rights. Class members will also learn what a strike is and connect that knowledge to the novel by completing a note-catcher and discussing the text. All materials are included in an engaging Common Core designed lesson.
Most of your learners have probably heard of Martin Luther King, Jr., or Cesar Chavez, but could they also recognize the names of Betty Friedan or Dolores Huerta? Give your learners the opportunity to discover the many accomplishments of women who played a key role during the civil rights movement.
Students analyze different perspectives of the history of the Holocaust. They experience primary and secondary sources along with pieces from literature, documentaries, songs and letters. A commitment of honor and dedication is expressed through the thoughts and feelings experienced by the survivors of the Holocaust viewed in this lesson.
Successful women make their mark in fields from computers, journalism, labor and racing
America was built on the strength of its workers, and on Labor Day we recognize their contributions.
Learners create a timeline on the development of the Pajaro Valley Area. In this social science lesson, students discuss the changes that took place in the area over the past 300 years. They draw a pictures of how the area has changed during particular time periods.
Fifth graders investigate the lives and contributions of Latinos whose life and work permeate our culture. They use information about their subjects to produce a guided paragraph.
Young scholars explore the changes in American farming practices. Through several days of reading and research, students write an essay explaining the changes that have led to the need for migrant workers. Young scholars discuss how workers are hired and why they are willing to work for small wages. They create a poster advertising production by farmworkers and simulate an interview between a migrant worker and a social worker.
Students examine myths and stereotypes about Hispanic immigrant groups. They appreciate and share the strengths of their diversity and view films that challenge ideas about education and cultural values. They explore the Latino Rights Movements that took shape in the l960's and l970's.
Eleventh graders participate in a lecture on the history of Latin Americans and the role of Latin-American women writers. As a class, they read a story together and identify what lessons the narrator gained throughout the story. In groups, they examine the author's life and compare it to their own. To end the lesson, they use the internet to research various aspects of Latino culture.
Fifth graders investigate various historical figures of the target culture, along with their contributions to culture by using age appropriate readings. They create an acrostic poem for a project.
Students research prominent human rights activists from U.S. history. They report the biographical facts of their subject along with information on the causes he or she represented. Students also examine local human rights issues and consider ways in which activism can make a difference.

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Dolores Huerta