Duck Teacher Resources

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Students observe ducks at a local wetland. They answer various questions about the ducks behavior and write the answers on a downloadable worksheet.
Make origami ducks with your class to reinforce geometry concepts and vocabulary; develop fine motor and visual translation skills; and enrich study of Japanese culture, the pond habitat, or migration. Create a whole group "worksheet" about shapes and symmetry with a word bank. Links to instructions for the duck folds are difficult to follow. Look online for other models and practice, practice, practice; you'll need to master the folds to support children during independent practice.
Students complete various activities related to the book "Farmer Duck" by Martin Waddell. They participate in a shared reading of the book, identify the animal sounds, act out the story, and write sentences using speech bubbles.
Students "save" a rare duck (or goose, or swan) from extinction by "building" a sanctuary to protect and breed it in captivity. They research what the bird needs and draw the species and its enclosure.
In this online interactive reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 15 multiple choice questions based on The Wild Duck. Students may submit their answers to be scored.
In this word recognition worksheet, students trace the word "duck," write the word independently, and color the picture of the duck.
In this word recognition worksheet, students trace the word "duck," write the word independently, and color the picture of the duck.
For this word recognition worksheet, students trace the word "duck," write the word independently, and color the picture of the duck.
In this word recognition worksheet, students trace the word "duck," write the word independently, and color the picture of the duck.
Students explore mathematics by reading a book about ducks. For this counting lesson, students read the story One Duck, Another Duck and participate in the counting activities the book demonstrates. Students examine a list of vocabulary words from the story and answer study questions.
Students read the book Dawdle Duckling and complete different activities about the book. Students research the wetlands, research ducks, complete an oil and water experiment, map a cove, and more.
Students study the similarities and differences between ducks, geese, and swans. They tell the story about how water fowl adapt to life in water using props.
In this creative internet inquiry worksheet, students research, answer and analyze a variety of facts and questions about ducks.
Sixth graders read the beginning chapter of Duck for President and find similes and metaphors when they read. In this literature lesson plan, 6th graders also read about President Lincoln and answer short answer questions about him.
Students watched a film featuring Tommy Turtle who should them how to "duck and cover" in case of atomic attack. They then practiced the drill by hiding under their desk. In introducing Tommy Turtle the teacher explained the great danger they faced since the Russians had the bomb.
In this Internet research worksheet about ducks, students access a given web site to find the answers to 7 questions and to make identifications of 5 pictures that are on the worksheet. They print out coloring pages and learn a new song about ducks by accessing two more sites.
Clear up "lame duck" congressional confusion with this political cartoon analysis worksheet. Background information on the concept's history and current use is provided, and 2 cartoons give a past and present context. Three talking points (could be writing points) guide educated conclusions about the more modern cartoon, and encourage deeper thinking about potential advantages to being a lame duck politician. Another question delves into the use of idiom in the cartoons.
In this current events learning exercise, students analyze a political cartoon aboutĀ lame duck sessionsĀ and respond to 3 talking point questions.
In this duck parts worksheet, students match up nineteen different parts of a duck to where they are found on a duck by drawing a line from one to the other.
In this recognizing the life cycle of a duck worksheet, students read sentences explaining the sequence of the life cycle and number the pictures in the correct order. Students number four pictures.

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