Elements of Timing Teacher Resources

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Twelfth graders investigate how West-African dance makes known a common past and stimulates a shared sense of values and beliefs. The cultural purpose of West-African dance is to tell history and relay stories to intensify social and religious rituals.
Sixth graders practice four different cultural or traditional (folk) dances and participate in whole-class and small-group discussions that invite critical thinking to draw inferences. Students choose specific countries or regions to research, examining their histories, geographies, climates, governments, economics, cultures and arts.
Seventh graders research the six European "postage stamp" (small) countries and research interesting facts about them. In groups, they are assigned to one of the six countries of Andorra, Liechtenstein, Malta, Monaco, San Marino, or Vatican City. On poster board, 7th graders create a postage stamp for their country.
Students discuss dance elements and create a dance map. They choose a dance theme and incorporate movement into their dance maps and choreography. They also experiment with different types of music.
Sixth graders study South African dances to learn about dancing styles in their country. In this dance lesson, 6th graders watch a video of dances and mark the movements they observe. Students then answer questions about the video. Students research South African dances by finding pictures of the dances, listing the dances, demonstrating the dances, and bringing a unique item about the dance to class.
Students dance to the song by Kids in Motion called "Show Me What You Feel" and create their own individual style of creative expression at the given cues for the specific emotions using a colored scarf and body movements.
Tenth graders participate in a instructional activity guided by an essential question: in what ways does choreographer, Mark Morris' work, "The Office," reflect Eastern-European traditional folk dance? During the instructional activity's first sessions, students physically learn two to three traditional folk dances from selected regions in Eastern Europe.
Second graders use their bodies to create various shapes to make a dance when given various music and beats. In this shapes and dance lesson plan, 2nd graders create lines, curves, twists, and angles with their bodies.
High schoolers investigate the process and components present in a dance composition. They create their own composition for the purpose of recreating all he elements of a dance composition. The dance is written in a journal for the purpose of reference and reflection.
Students conclude the semester with an individual movement study utilizing basic elements of dance and choreography previously covered in class. They will choose from three choreographic prompts presented a few days before giving them class time to begin their process.
Students study introductory history and cultural purposes of selected Japanese dance forms. They analyze the philosophical beliefs, social systems, and movement norms that influence the function and role of Japanese dance in the lives of its people.
This four to five day mini dance unit has many components. Discussion on what makes a good dance partner, research on famous dancing pairs, as well as learning a choreographed piece in class. The class learns a short dance sequence and performs with different partners to experience the important partnering elements.
After introducing basic dance and music terminology, learners explore Balinese culture. They listen to Balinese music, view images or video of Balinese dancing, then choreograph a Balinese-style dance of their own. They rehearse and perform their dances in front of the class while beating a rhythm on percussion instruments. 
Introduce young learners to line dancing. Here are some simple movement patterns to teach them. First teach, repeat, and repeat again without music. Then when they have a pretty good grasp of the movement patterns, add music and practice some more. Most youngster like to move to music, so have some fun with this physical activity that is also good for the brain!
Build vocabulary while reading A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle. Provided here is a great resource to use as a companion piece to your literature instruction. The packet is made up of 50 words separated into five lists of ten. Each list has a corresponding fill-in-the-blank exercise. Test your pupils' knowledge of vocabulary and literature with the 25-question vocabulary quiz and the provided essay prompt.
Young scholars explore the elements of tempo, beat and rhythm. They create rhythm patterns and an original dance. In groups, students perform their phrases for their peers. As a class, they explore choreographic principles, processes and structures.
Sixth graders combine sounds or movements to create rhythm in dance and language. In this rhythm lesson, 6th graders read a poem and listen to the rhythm in the words. Students complete dance movements using sequence of pattern movements. Students then create a word bank and clap the rhythm of the words. Students participate in a rhythm choreography dance and journal reflections.
Students demonstrate the concepts of time through movement, beat, and rhythm.
Learners write poems using rhyme and meter as they come to understand the mechanical concept of rhythm. They discover that rhythm is seen in dance and sports, poetry and other literary forms, and communication in general. They recognize stylistic elements such as voice, tone and style, and draft, revise, edit and proofread for a legible final copy.
Get those boys dancing! Here's a dance activity that is choreographed around the use of a basketball. Teach them this line dance and see how they do. Watch the provided video yourself, or better yet, use the video to teach this dance. You could also have the class make suggestions to change up the dance or perhaps let them choreograph a dance with a partner using the basketball. Hopefully, this will help increase participation from more of the boys in your class.

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Elements of Timing