Elements of Timing Teacher Resources

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Twelfth graders explore West African Ku Ku dance. As a class, learners discuss the influence African dances have on the United Sates of today, as well as the history of the dance. Students observe and participate in a dance demonstration. They practice movement patterns and write movement vocabulary in their journals.
Seventh graders explore the traditional dances of various immigrants into the United States. While attending a cultural event from a specific immigrant group, 7th graders observe cultural dances. They interview members of the ethnic group and learn the dance. Pupils create a formal presentation to be given in class.
Learners participate in a unit in which they learn 11 different dances. They choreograph their own dance or find an dance on the Internet to perform for the culminating activity.
Tenth graders recognize that many groups contributed to the richness of culture in the United States. This lesson provides an opportunity for students to learn more about the groups of people who built their way of life in the United States.
Learners study the art of Bharata Natyam Indian dance. In this Indian dance lesson, students read text about Indian dance Bharata Natyam dance. Learners may create their own dance and a television story about the topic.
Sixth graders study South African dances to learn about dancing styles in their country. In this dance instructional activity, 6th graders watch a video of dances and mark the movements they observe. Students then answer questions about the video. Students research South African dances by finding pictures of the dances, listing the dances, demonstrating the dances, and bringing a unique item about the dance to class.
Students discuss dance elements and create a dance map. They choose a dance theme and incorporate movement into their dance maps and choreography. They also experiment with different types of music.
Learners explore and experience jazz as a social dance form. They study how jazz was an important piece of African-American culture and how it developed.
First graders discuss different kinds of music they have heard. They listen to a short selection of folk music and discuss where they think it is from. Using a globe, the teacher shows students where the music is from. They spread out on the floor and do a dance (dance steps are described on the lesson plan).
After introducing basic dance and music terminology, learners explore Balinese culture. They listen to Balinese music, view images or video of Balinese dancing, then choreograph a Balinese-style dance of their own. They rehearse and perform their dances in front of the class while beating a rhythm on percussion instruments. 
Students examine the role of men in the American Ballet Theatre. In this ballet lesson, students watch segments of the Great Performances video "Dance in America: Born to be Wild: The Leading Men of the American Ballet Theatre." Students conduct further research pertaining to male ballet and create presentations to share with their classmates.
Fourth graders physically learn kolos or circle dances, discuss what they are learning with their peers and write in their daily journals. They apply critical thinking skills to draw inferences about Eastern European immigrant groups in Ohio.
Eighth graders investigate modern-dance choreographer Merce Cunningham's historically significant contribution to dance-making history. Specifically, 8th graders explore and practice Merce Cunningham's choreographic use of chance operations (probability), through kinesthetic and movement exploration.
High schoolers demonstrate knowledge of the processes, principles, and structure of line dance. In groups students choreograph their own line dance, implementing moves learned from previous dances taught in the line dance unit.
Students discuss folk dancing and perform a line dance to reinforce story telling through movement. They discover and practice given dance steps and perform a dance to the theme music, 'You've Got a Friend of Me' from the movie, 'Toy Story.'
Sixth graders combine sounds or movements to create rhythm in dance and language. For this rhythm lesson, 6th graders read a poem and listen to the rhythm in the words. Students complete dance movements using sequence of pattern movements. Students then create a word bank and clap the rhythm of the words. Students participate in a rhythm choreography dance and journal reflections.
Students explore how dance can invoke the significance of experiences in their everyday lives. They work in small dance troupes to create their own dance pieces reflecting themes and experiences relevant to their lives.
Pupils investigate the process and components present in a dance composition. They create their own composition for the purpose of recreating all he elements of a dance composition. The dance is written in a journal for the purpose of reference and reflection.
Young scholars conclude the semester with an individual movement study utilizing basic elements of dance and choreography previously covered in class. They will choose from three choreographic prompts presented a few days before giving them class time to begin their process.
Students study introductory history and cultural purposes of selected Japanese dance forms. They analyze the philosophical beliefs, social systems, and movement norms that influence the function and role of Japanese dance in the lives of its people.

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Elements of Timing