Equality Teacher Resources

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Students explore the concept of civil rights and the ways in which Dr. Martin Luther Kind and others utilized non-violent protests to achieve their goals. They participate in a variety of discussion and role play activities during this comprehensive unit.
Students explore history of voting rights in America, discuss restrictions on early voting, apply voting rights to specific situations, form human timeline showing how voting rights have changed, and write editorial stating their opinions.
Students examine the history of African American voting rights. In this voting rights lesson plan, students listen to a lecture on African American voting rights between the years 1890 and 1965. Students respond to discussion questions following the lecture.
Young scholars read and respond to the text, Mama Went to Jail for the Vote. For this literary response lesson, students are introduced to vocabulary terms and read the book. Young scholars discuss various text-to-self connections they made to the book.
Fifth graders explore the history of women's right to vote and identify two of the leaders of the suffrage movement, Alice Paul and Lucy Burns. After completing readings and discussions, they write an article for the newspaper about Alice Paul and Lucy Burns.
Learners consider what human rights are. They comprehend the origins of modern human rights. Students appreciate the meaning and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. They appreciate the relationship between rights and responsibilities. Learners analyze the relationship of human rights to daily life.
Fifth graders examine the voting process in a democracy. In this voting lesson, 5th graders apply the voting process as the work with their class pledge which is meant to represent the state/federal constitution. They register for a classroom vote and simulate going to the polls to cast their votes.
Students examine the suffrage struggle of African Americans. In this American history lesson, students research primary documents regarding the strategies used by African Americans to secure the right to vote during the Civil Rights Movement. Students analyze the success of the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.
Students read the book You Want Women to Vote Lizzie Stanton? and complete discussion questions about the book. In this equal rights for women lesson plan, students also have discussions about what has changed in history about women's rights.
Students examine the philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois. In this political activity students analyze the philosophies of two prominent African Americans in history. They look to see who's strategy for equal economic and political rights for African Americas was more appropriate.
Lesson 10 in a series of human rights lessons focuses on the skills of finding evidence and summarizing. Your young readers work to compare the two texts they have read in this unit: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and “Teaching Nepalis to Read, Plant, and Vote”. Groups start by nicknaming articles from the UDHR with names like "right to marry" or "right to vote". After reviewing and summarizing the UDHR articles with nicknames, groups will work to match these various rights with instances in “Teaching Nepalis to Read, Plant, and Vote”. To wrap-up the lesson, individuals will write a short opinion piece on rights that were upheld or violated using the firsthand account as evidence. Note: See the additional materials to find an index for all of these lessons. 
This resource is rich with primary and secondary source material regarding major events in the Atlantic world during the Age of Revolution. While there are suggested classroom activities toward the beginning of the resource, its true value lies in the reproductions of such major historical documents as the United States Declaration of Independence, the Haitian Declaration of Independence, and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Use the sentence frames in the Classroom Guide as a solid framework for considering the theme of freedom and what it means to different individuals as you review the instructional materials.
Students examine the time after the Civil War known as Reconstruction. In groups, they role play a Senate Subcommittee Hearing on Reconstruction in which some members are senators and others are witnesses. They share their ideas on how they believe Reconstruction should be carried out.
In these Ell vocabulary acquisition worksheets, students complete several pages of activities that help them learn and use the words from the word family of equal and equi-.
What if society sought equality by handicapping the gifted and dispelling any traces of diversity? Kurt Vonnegut Jr. offers one possible answer to this question through his incredibly engaging and thought-provoking satirical story, "Harrison Bergeron". In addition to offering writing prompts and discussion questions that are sure to spark interest and debate amongst your readers, you will also have the opportunity to preview video excerpts where editors of the anthology engage in high-level discourse and work to elicit meaning from the classic American text.
Eleventh graders examine the job of a citizen.  In this civics lesson, 11th graders create a human timeline discussing the different groups that struggled with voting rights.  Students research these groups and present their findings to the class. 
The history of women's suffrage and Susan B. Anthony are examined in this social studies lesson. Third and fourth graders participate in a simulation of a vote, develop slogans for women's suffrage, complete a KWL chart, write a tribute or letter, and create a class newspaper.
Students examine the problems associated with gender based and race based education. In groups, they research the history of education and the laws that have changed education and impacted lives. They brainstorm a list of the positives and negatives of each concept and develop a plan in which separate but equal could be implemented as a role play activity.
Students examine several aspects of the Women's Suffrage Movement. In this women's rights lesson plan, students explore several primary and secondary sources regarding the events of the movement, opposition to the movement, and the effects of the 19th Amendment. Student complete various assessment activities that require them to compare suffrage movements, analyze primary sources, and determine how effective the movement was.
Students explore the basic rights granted to all American citizens by the U.S. Constitution in the light of women's issues. The women's suffrage movement, the role of Susan B. Anthony, and the timeline of events on voting rights are considered.

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