Expressive Reading Teacher Resources

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Students review the concept of expressive reading. Through modeling the teacher shows them that more expression makes reading more interesting and enjoyable to listen to. They review ending punctuation marks and the types of expression and intonation that should go with each. They practice expressive reading.
Reading with expression is an important component in developing fluency. Emerging readers learn different strategies for accomplishing this skill through the teacher's model reading of Earrings!. Partner practice is combined with effective modeling for the book The Father Who Walked on His Hands. A checklist serves as an assessment tool at the end of the lesson to guide re-teaching.
Student practice reading fluently and expressively through the use of writing. various. After discussing how expressive reading enhances the reading experience, 3rd graders write a story featuring expressive words and correct punctuation. In pairs, they read each other's stories with expression.
Students work to improve their oral expression while reading aloud. They read and record an entire story with a partner and listen to the playback of the readings. They evaluate their expressive language using a given checklist.
Review the concept of expressive reading. Through modeling, the teacher shows them that more expression makes reading more interesting and enjoyable to listen to. They review ending punctuation marks and the types of expression and intonation that should go with each. Then they practice expressive reading.
Students read orally with expression in this lesson. They read sentences stressing different emotions with appropriate expression. The teacher models expressive vs. non-expressive reading, and they practice with a partner. Their reading is recorded.
Students determine the importance of and how to read with expression. They determine this by watching a model of fluent reading and then practicing expressive reading by doing repeated readings. They use word chunks to break down long words.
Young scholars practice reading with expression. After discussing how reading with feeling and expression can enhance the reading experience, students listen as the instructor reads a story with expression. Young scholars complete a read with the students and assess their expression.
Student increase their reading fluency through the use of various strategies. After reviewing decoding strategies, 3rd graders, working in groups, write sentences that could be read with expression. Each member of the group takes turns reading their sentences.
Students review the use of word chunks to assist them in reading long words. Next, they practice reading with expression by reading Dr Seuss', Green Eggs and Ham with a reading buddy. As an assessment, they read a passage with an expression that a partner reveals on a flashcard. They use the rubric to assess a partner.
Students explore the ways to promote fluent and expressive reading in children. By reading the whole text, the children should increase their fluency and word recognition. Books with long vowels are stressed in this lesson.
Students are exposed to five components of fluency: reading faster, reading smoother, reading more expressively, reading silently, and reading voluntarily. Therefore, in order for children to become fluent readers, they must learn to read expressively. This lesson is intended to show children what expressive reading is, and to help them become expressive readers themselves so that they can move one step closer to fluency.
Help young readers enhance fluency. Emphasize the importance of expression by reading a story, paying attention to the role punctuation plays. Then allow time for kids to practice by working with a partner who takes notes and provides constructive criticism on use of emotion, pacing, and other forms of expression. Assessment is conducted as pairs practice using included checklist.
Work to improve oral expression while reading aloud. Young scholars read sentence strips, changing their volume, speed, and tone to match what is written, making the sentence more meaningful. They read an entire story with a partner who uses a checklist to evaluate their use of expression.
Students explore expressive reading. In this literature lesson, students read the book The True Story of the Three Little Pigs and interpret key themes. Students perform a different version of the text.
Pupils work to improve their oral expression while reading aloud. They read sentence strips, changing their volume, speed, and tone, to match what is written and to make the sentence more meaningful. They read an entire story with a partner, the partner evaluating their expression using a self-created checklist.
Looking to move children away from monotone reading? That's what they will practice here. In a guided learning lesson, the class reviews punctuation marks and practices what type of intonation should accompany each. They then listen as the teacher uses effective reading expression. In pairs, they read to each other, first without expression, and then a second time with effective expression. Some preparation is required to create sentence strips and the assessment sheet. 
Students examine how reading with expression makes stories more interesting by listening to a reading in monotone and one with expression. Reading in pairs, they practice with passages of Judith Voirst's, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day while they complete an evaluation sheet of their partner. As an assessment, they complete a journal entry that describes what happened in the story and illustrate what it looks like to read with expression.
First graders practice rereading selected passages to improve their reading fluency. Working in pairs, 1st graders read and reread decodable, leveled passages. They create a tape recording of their reading to assess their fluency and use of expression during reading.
Students observe and demonstrate how to read with expression. They discuss the types of emotions and expressions to use while reading, and identify the appropriate punctuation for a variety of sentences. Students then write a sentence that displays an emotion, and read the book "When Sophie Gets Angry! Really, Really Angry!"

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Expressive Reading