Factoring Binomials Teacher Resources

Find Factoring Binomials educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 49 resources
The teacher explains the many steps in simplifying a rational expression. The example shown in this video demonstrates a key technique of looking for opposite factors when canceling out common factors. At first it seems complicated but if you follow along and watch out for your negative numbers you can learn how to simplify this polynomial divided by a polynomial.
In this factoring binomials worksheet, students examine problems containing the difference of squares.  They factor binomial equations.  This one-page worksheet contains 15 problems.  Answers are provided.
The teacher explains the many steps in simplifying a rational expression using opposite binomial factors. At first it seems complicated but if you follow along and watch out for your negative numbers you can learn how to simplify this polynomial divided by a polynomial.
Ninth graders factor trinomial expressions. In this trinomial lesson plan, 9th graders use the given trinomial form to factor expressions. Students use algebra tiles to identify the binomial factors and a graphing calculator to verify the results. Students also identify the x-intercepts and y-intercepts of each trinomial function and explore its relationships.
In this factoring worksheet, learners find the GCF of monomials, they factor binomials and trinomials. This two-page worksheet contains 25 multi-step problems.
So you are looking for all the possible binomial factors of a trinomial expression? First find the factors of the coefficients. Then set up a table or template to do a guess and check. Write out, using the template, all the possible combinations.
Here is a TI-Navigator™ activity that allows students to review the concept of factoring and solving quadratic binomials, including a connection to graphical solutions. They enter a number such as -2 using the minus key and not the negative (-) key (due to the inability of the number fields to support more than one possible answer).
In this factoring worksheet, students determine the greatest common factor. They factor binomials and use the zero-product property to simplify equations. This three-page worksheet contains 27 problems.
In this algebra learning exercise, students simplify monomials, perform basic operations on two polynomials, and factor binomials and trinomials. There are 20 questions and a bonus.
For this factoring worksheet, students factor monomials and binomials. students group factor groups. This one-page worksheet contains 15 problems.
Using Wolframalpha graphing capabilites, algebra learners graph polynomials with degrees of three and larger. They identify the roots and graph each polynomial, predict zeros and shapes of graphs, and validate their understanding through graphing. 
In this online math learning exercise, students solve 5 problems which require them to factor using binomials. This excellent learning exercise gives the students "hints" should they encounter difficulties. This learning exercise is an excellent resource which will foster independent learning.
Students use algebra tiles to identify the binomial factors and the graphing calculator to verify the result. In addition, they will identify the x-intercepts and y-intercepts of each trinomial function and explore relationships between the trinomial x2 + bx + c and its factored form (x + m)(x + n).
Learners factor polynomials representing the difference of squares, perfect square trinomials, and the sum and difference of two cubes. They identify and factor binomials that are the differences of squares when given examples.
What is the difference of a cube? When is it used? How does it work? Use it to factor a binomial involving subtraction. Rewrite the terms as a cubed expression. Then apply the difference of cubes formula. Don't forget to simplify. Still a bit confused? Watch this video as the instructor goes through and explains each of the steps to factor this binomial.
What are the characteristics of a polynomial that would make it factorable by the difference of squares rule? There are four must haves: two terms, coefficients are perfect squares, minus sign, degree of each term is even or zero. If it meets all these criteria, then it can be solved using the difference of squares method.
Have you ever heard of the FOIL method? Watch and learn how the FOIL method can be used to help you multiply binomials. It all starts with a tic-tac-toe box and two polynomials then ends with a correct answer.
How do you know that a binomial can be factored using the difference of squares? First try finding the greatest common factor and pulling that out. Then take a look at what is left. Are the coefficients perfect squares? Then it could be a difference of squares. Watch the instructor break down this expression into simplest terms.
When first looking at this polynomial and thinking about factoring it into binomials, the task seems daunting because the numbers just look icky. But watch this video and see the instructor demonstrate how to factor by the A-C method. She makes it look so easy.
Practice is an important learning tool. This practice problem allows students to apply their know-how to factoring a binomial with a difference of squares. Sal explains his process briefly, which makes this video appropriate for those who are already familiar with this concept.

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Factoring Binomials