Fertilization Teacher Resources

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Students view a PowerPoint presentation about pregnancy. They work in groups to complete activities at each of six stations. Students create a baby from clay dough. They use construction paper to design a quilt square. Students complete a journal writing exercise to summarize new information.
Students examine their prior knowledge of cell regeneration and therapeutic use of stem cells. After reading an article, they discover new techniques for deriving embryonic stem cells. In groups, they research on the different types of stem cells and write about one aspect of interest to them.
A health lesson presents all aspects of conception and pregnancy. Fourth through sixth-graders define terms associated with pregnancy, label a chart of a woman, and discuss how pregnancy occurs. Some excellent activities and a wonderful worksheet are included in this impressive plan. Answers for the worksheet are available as well.
Students examine human health by identifying dangerous pesticides. In this agriculture lesson, students research the food production system in the United States and discuss dangers such as pesticides, chemicals and insecticides which poison our food and poison humans as well. Students create a list of healthy fruits and vegetables on a worksheet and discuss the benefits of eating organic food.
Learners identify the parts of a male and female reproductive system and what the jobs of those parts are.  In this reproduction lesson students describe some reproductive technologies. 
Seventh graders take a survey to determine their attitudes toward sexuality. In groups, they identify female and male reproductive organs and develop a list of secondary sex traits during puberty. They also discuss the stages of the menstrual cycle and how the fetus develops. To end the lesson, they discuss how to prevent sexually transmitted diseases.
Students investigate the interference of various drugs on an embryo through experimentation. This is an open-ended lab to allow students to see effects of various chemicals humans choose to put in their bodies and create questions they can test in future experiments.
Tenth graders work in teams to order events of DNA transcription and translation protein synthesis. In the second lesson, they put the steps of mitosis and meiosis in order using a concept map poster. They use modeling clay to create models of cells undergoing these changes. In the third lesson, 10th graders create Punnett squares, and participate in an interactive lecture on genes, alleles, traits and geno/pheno types.
Students comprehend that karyotyping is a process in which chromosomes are cut from an enlarged picture and arranged in decreasing order of size. The cells to be viewed are first chemically treated to increase the number of dividing white blood cells and then treated with colchicines to stop mitotic division during anaphase. Lastly, the cells are burst open, stained and fixed. The slide is examined for well spread chromosomes, photographed, and karyotyped.
Student study possible effects the mother's nutritional habits will have on her baby. They see how important it is to eat right and examine a regular diet for a pregnant woman or one for a woman with diabetes or other physical problems.
Students identify their feelings and learn constructive ways of handling conflict.  In this conflict lesson students discuss their feelings and when they are feeling a certain way what they can do to remedy the situation. 
Students discuss facts and myths associates with pregnancy and how conception can and cannot occur. They study fetal development and review terminology. They play a review game.
Participants describe the process of pregnancy and childbirth. Working in pairs, they sequentially order a set of ten cards listing the steps of pregnancy and childbirth. After the cards are arranged correctly, each phase is discussed in detail. This lesson contains sensitive material. Please review to determine its suitablility for your class.
Tenth graders investigate about mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation and their purposes and implications in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms. Students use individual journals and a variety of hands-on activities summarized by group discussions.
Students study karyotyping, which is a process in which chromosomes are cut out from an enlarged picture and arranged in decreasing order of size. They use a template to arrange and glue chromosomes to data sheet, indicate sample code, chromosome abnormality and sex of sample.
A poignant 20-slide show introduces high schoolers to the amazing accomplishments of genomics and raises the question of eugenics. This lesson is only for mature audiences, as it deals with rape and other sensitive topics, but it is carefully written and highly valuable. Select questions are discussed following the presentation. 
Adolescents have the opportunity to consider how they feel about the possibilities presented by the current availability of genetic sequencing. After some instruction, they participate in a four-corners activity in which you read a controversial statement, and they gather into groups depending on whether they strongly agree, agree, disagree, or strongly disagree. 
In a sweet simulation, junior geneticists examine the chromosomes of a fictitious Reebop marshmallow animal, combine chromosomes to produce offspring, and then make a model of the resulting Reebop baby. Phenotypes include number of antennae, nose color, number of body segments, leg color, and more! The lesson even addresses X and Y chromosomes for the baby's gender. This memorable activity reinforces concepts of heredity and gives teens practice in using genetics language. 
Like a fresh canvas, stem cells can turn into almost anything. In a comprehensive activity, high school biologists use clay to build a 3-D model of cell division and the processes that occur during the first 14 days of development. Also included is a detailed graphic organizer for taking notes about the important concepts and vocabulary related to stem cells. The procedure is very clear and easy to follow; your pupils will enjoy getting their hands dirty while learning about how they all came to be. 
Learners complete a variety of activities as they examine the ethical issues behind stem cell research and cloning. They make their own ethical decisions on both subjects.

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