Fertilization Teacher Resources

Find Fertilization educational ideas and activities

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Student study possible effects the mother's nutritional habits will have on her baby. They see how important it is to eat right and examine a regular diet for a pregnant woman or one for a woman with diabetes or other physical problems.
Pupils identify their feelings and learn constructive ways of handling conflict.  In this conflict lesson students discuss their feelings and when they are feeling a certain way what they can do to remedy the situation. 
Students discuss facts and myths associates with pregnancy and how conception can and cannot occur. They study fetal development and review terminology. They play a review game.
Participants describe the process of pregnancy and childbirth. Working in pairs, they sequentially order a set of ten cards listing the steps of pregnancy and childbirth. After the cards are arranged correctly, each phase is discussed in detail. This activity contains sensitive material. Please review to determine its suitablility for your class.
Details of fertilization, cleavage, the placenta and fetal development are presented, along with important diagrams and illustrations. By using these slides, you and your students will generate discussion points, along with details needed for college preparation courses.
Open this lesson with a discussion on birth defects. Break the class into groups to visit a website and learn about what happens at each stage of human embryo and fetal development. Assign each group a particular birth defect to research and create a slide show to present to the rest of the class. Note that in Step three of the lesson plan, the PowerPoint that you are supposed to show is not included. There are, however, a student worksheet and group presentation grading rubric. 
Tenth graders investigate about mitosis, meiosis, and cell differentiation and their purposes and implications in the development and functioning of multicellular organisms. Students use individual journals and a variety of hands-on activities summarized by group discussions.
In this development learning exercise, students review the process of fertilization in placental organisms. Students determine what trimester certain events take place in a fetus' development. This learning exercise has 10 fill in the blank and 7 matching questions.
Students study karyotyping, which is a process in which chromosomes are cut out from an enlarged picture and arranged in decreasing order of size. They use a template to arrange and glue chromosomes to data sheet, indicate sample code, chromosome abnormality and sex of sample.
Students complete a variety of activities as they examine the ethical issues behind stem cell research and cloning. They make their own ethical decisions on both subjects.
In a sweet simulation, junior geneticists examine the chromosomes of a fictitious Reebop marshmallow animal, combine chromosomes to produce offspring, and then make a model of the resulting Reebop baby. Phenotypes include number of antennae, nose color, number of body segments, leg color, and more! The lesson even addresses X and Y chromosomes for the baby's gender. This memorable activity reinforces concepts of heredity and gives teens practice in using genetics language. 
Reebops are cute, marshmallow-based creatures that can be used to teach inheritance. Beginning biologists draw strips of paper that represent chromosomes from two envelopes, one for the father, and one for the mother. Each parent contributes an allelle to help determine the traits for the baby reebop. Traits include number of antennae, curly or straight tails, nose color, and more! To conclude the activity, learners construct a reebop model with the characteristics drawn. Adorable!
Like a fresh canvas, stem cells can turn into almost anything. In a comprehensive lesson, high school biologists use clay to build a 3-D model of cell division and the processes that occur during the first 14 days of development. Also included is a detailed graphic organizer for taking notes about the important concepts and vocabulary related to stem cells. The procedure is very clear and easy to follow; your pupils will enjoy getting their hands dirty while learning about how they all came to be. 
The living environment, from the interior of a cell to the complex relationships among populations, are queried in this final examination. Learners look at air pollution maps, diagrams of cells, population graphs, and drawing of cells. They answer multiple choice, graphing, and written response style questions. This is truly an all-encompassing assessment!
This exam touches upon every topic within the typical first year biology course.. A broad variety of question styles give high schoolers every opportunity to show what they know. Why start from scratch when a comprehensive final exam is easily available to you?
Emerging ecologists need a full understanding of life, from the inner workings of a cell to the complex relationships among organisms. This examination is meant to assess high schoolers after an entire year course on the living environment. You will find 42 mulitple choice questions, as well as chart completion, diagram analysis, and written response to reading. This and other Regents examinations are ideal practice for AP tests.
Environmental science enthusiasts show what they know at the end of the year by taking this full-fledged final exam. They answer multiple choice, graph interpretation, and essay analysys questions, 73 of them in all. Topics range from cell structure and function to population ecology. This exam blows others away with the variety included!
Ninth graders are introduced to the concept of human embryology. Individually, they complete an exercise in which they determine which trait they got from which family member. In groups, they identify and label the reproductive organs of males and females. As a class, they discuss the moral and ethic issues involved with test tube babies to end the lesson.
Twelfth graders define cloning in their own words and examine the different types of cloning. After reading an article, they summarize it in their own words and use the internet to research the history of cloning. In groups, they participate in an experiment in which they simulate the process of bacterial cloning. To end the instructional activity, they research the most recent court cases and develop their own opinion on the issue.
In this environmental worksheet students complete a series of multiple choice and short answer questions on cell types, cell division, chromosomes and plant species.

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