Film Teacher Resources

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Why just show your class a movie when you could teach them how to critique film the same way they do literature? While this lesson uses Battlestar Galactica as its visual text of choice, this plan could be used with any film selection. It would be perfect to use with the film adaptation of any literary work. Teens learn what it means to critique as well as how to identify literary and technical aspects of film as they watch various films.
Use this general lesson guide to inform your instruction surrounding a documentary. The lesson is made up of five activities. The activities are intentionally general because they are designed to adapted for specific films. While the lesson was originally designed to go with the films on the same site as the plan, they could be used with virtually any film. Additionally, the resource includes a series of questions grouped by theme that could be asked about any film.
Students begin the lesson by reading a book on film study. After watching the movie "Citizen Kane", they work together to identify the issues concerning the United States before World War II. As a class, they discuss how the ideas and views of the directors make their way into a film.
Students analyze film terminology to become analytical views and critically examine media. In this film analysis, students identify film terminology and explain the effects of the director's choices. Students analyze cinematic and theatrical elements in the film.
Students read texts, view film and video and conduct research in an analysis and comparison of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" and the Kabuki piece "Chushingura". They focus their analysis on the theme of revenge.
A viewing of Silver Sling begins a consideration of the issues related to and the need for surrogate mothers. Class members then compare the stance of the film to that of the article, “Surrogate Mothers: Womb for Rent.” Richly detailed and thoughtful, the packet includes discussion questions, links to nonfiction articles related to the issues, graphic organizers, and worksheets. A great way to address Common Core standards.
Students view the film Fog of War and discuss the most striking elements of the film. They focus on chosen lessons from robert McNamara's life such as: empathy, rationality and proportionality.
Students explore a fundamental knowledge of darkroom practice. Students access the basic aspects of black-and-white film processing, printing and enlarging. Students acquaint themselves with functions and purposes of darkroom equipment and darkroom procedures.
Students examine the impact the Atlantic Slave Trade had on Africa and the African people, through the analysis of literature and film. They identify the geographic regions of Africa and locate selected African countries, countries that are used as later case studies in the examination the legacy of slavery and colonialism
Students view the film "Nell" and analyze it for presentation of language pathologies and dialects. They consider the definition of dialect, research phonetic representation of dialects and observe their own communities for speech patterns.
Seventh graders define race, ethnic group, and culture. They identify the ways in which words are used in political cartoons and examine the way visual elements in a cartoon determine the meaning of words and enhance their impact. They explain the concept of stereotyping.
Students explore American history through films about baseball. In this film study instructional activity, students watch video clips from "The Babe," "A League of Their Own," "Eight Men Out," "The Jackie Robinson Story," and "Field of Dreams." Students then use the provided film analysis sheet to log their impressions of the films and discuss American history topics.
Students compare and contrast the narrative form of film with the artistic style. They also compare the screwball comedy genres with the film noir genre. They examine the historical roots of film.
Students examine the contributions of a few African American actors. After watching different films, they work together to recreate the film and the struggles faced by the actors. In groups, they compare and contrast the acting style of the different actors. To end the lesson, they identify the stereotypes used in films to represent African Americans.
Students discuss the purpose of city symphonies that were used in the past. In groups, they compare and contrast the social systems of a school and city to create their own city symphony video together. They also write what is known as a treatment in the present tense to introduce the characters and setting. They record their video and present it to the class.
Young scholars think critically about artistic freedom and evaluate the aims and effectiveness of censorship and education. They begin an investigation of the ongoing controversy surrounding Mel Gibson's "The Passion of Christ" by reading "New Film May Harm Gibson's Career." In small groups, students research the issues raised by the film and contribute two written pages to an intellectual guide designed to sharpen viewer's critical thinking skills.
Point of View’s short film, “34x25x36” launches a study of how images presented by mannequins and advertisements influence body image. Class members read and discuss the fact sheet "Media's Effect on Girls: Body Image and Gender Identity." Activities, discussion questions, and resource links are included. Preview the film to determine whether or not it is appropriate for your class.
This is an excellent resource for teachers to use for incorporating the motion picture Glory into the classroom! Breaking down the film into particular noteworthy and telling scenes, the guide offers important considerations for each scene and the chance to facilitate discussion in your class with thought-provoking questions. 
Students identify different transitions used in the editing process. They discover the contributions of D.W. Griffith to the development of film art. They discover how to analyze films more carefully.
Students define many terms related to film and genres. They examine examples of screwball comedy and apply the vocabulary terms to that genre. They discover how to "read" or analyze films they watch.

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