Filmmaking Teacher Resources

Find Filmmaking educational ideas and activities

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Editing is a major part of making an amazing film. Young film makers examine a clip from the movie Citizen Kane. They then discuss two editing techniques and examine them in other films. They write out short scenes, film them, and then edit as planned. This is a great lesson plan that spans several class periods and includes several good web links.
Students explore women's history through films and filmaking. They explore various websites, conduct research on a famous woman, and in small groups write and produce a screenplay based on an autobiographical narrative.
Students view the film Fog of War and discuss the most striking elements of the film. They focus on chosen lessons from robert McNamara's life such as: empathy, rationality and proportionality.
In pairs learners perform a silent skit portraying relationships between two known characters from a popular book or a play for their classmates. Next, the class will read and discuss a NYTimes article about a film school in the Bronx that influences urban teens positively through acting. Following, a short film clip will be viewed provoking a class discussion on character development. To sum up the lesson each pupil will create a wordless storyboard depicting the film. 
Students make their own short film about a hero of their choice. They create their own script and edit their video.
Young scholars role-play advertising executives in an exploration of how films are marketed on the Web to distinct audiences.
Students watch a video about wild stallions and conduct research about wild horses and wildlife photography. Students explore the relationships between animals and humans and conduct Internet research about the treatment of wild horses in the United States. Students create a mock newscast about their findings.
Point of view is everything, especially when reporting about the war in Afghanistan. Class members compare and contrast the same event from the war in Afghanistan as reported by five different sources. Learners are also asked to rank the reliability of various sources. Preview the powerful and thought-provoking materials before deciding whether or not to use with your class.
In this Kitano Takeshi worksheet, students read a passage about Kitano Takeshi and then complete worksheets such as spelling, a listening gap fill, synonym matching, scrambled sentences, and more.
Students are introduced to the characteristics of documentaries and making films. Individually, they write their own proposal for an idea of a documentary making sure to identify the point of view of which it is going to be filmed. After watching a video, they examine the experiences and contributions of Asian Americans to the United States.
In this famous person worksheet, students read a passage about Steven Spielberg and then complete a variety of in-class and homework activities to support comprehension, including partner interviews, spelling, cloze, synonym matches, and scrambled sentences.
Students study and discuss a short film by Chel White in this introductory lesson provided by Oregon Public Broadcasting. There are some scenes in the video towards the end that may be objectionable.
Students examine how a scene in a movie or in literature is constructed. In this film and literature lesson students answer questions based on film clips then create storyboards depicting a scene from their life.
In this famous person worksheet, students read a passage about Francis Firebrace and then complete a variety of in-class and homework activities to support comprehension, including partner interviews, spelling, cloze, synonym matches, and scrambled sentences.
In this famous person worksheet, students read a passage about Michael Moore and then complete a variety of in-class and homework activities to support comprehension, including partner interviews, spelling, cloze, synonym matches, and scrambled sentences.
Middle schoolers research the life of Norman Jewison and create a poster to present their findings to the class.
Learners examine the influence of photographer Jerome Liebling on documentary films. They read and discuss an article, take photographs, and create an original photo essay and artist statement.
High schoolers watch a varietry of films showing college life. In groups, they take different scenerios from the films and determine how they would have reacted. As a class, they discuss more in depth the issues they might face in college. To end the instructional activity, they research the life and works of Spike Lee and John Singleton.
Young scholars explore, examine and study Christian beliefs about punishment, justice and capital punishment. They view and analyze the way complex moral and ethical issues are dealt with in moving images like the screen/movie. Each student watches "To Encourage the Others."
Students practice making predictions. In this making predictions lesson, students watch a video segment regarding an otter separated from its family. Students predict what will happen to the otter and write narrative pieces from differing perspectives.

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