Flashback Teacher Resources

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Class members must provide definitions for a list of literary terms. The resource could be used as a notebook reference sheet, as a review, or as a group work activity.
Discuss disability awareness and acceptance of people who are different with this resource. After reading the story, Can You Feel the Thunder? by Lynn E. McElfresh, learners talk about metaphors, answer cause and effect questions, and summarize the story.
Scholars read and re-write, in Standard English, a short selection from Dovey Coe and note importance of use of dialect in novel. Then they examine their own use of dialect in everyday speech, and write a narrative using both casual dialect and Standard English. By using shorter sections of text, this lesson could also work with lower grades.
The final exercise in a series of lessons about writing a novel, this resource focuses on how to begin a story. The directions are clear, examples are plentiful, and practice activities provide writers with several possible options. Whether they start at the beginning, start with an inciting incident, start in the middle of things, or start at the end, your writers will be well prepared to draft their novel or a narrative of any length.
What is the difference between a news story and a personal narrative? This plan has learners write a personal narrative using the topic of service projects in their community. Consider completing a cross-curricular extension by bringing in a speaker or sketching scenes to accompany the narrative. 
Useful in an Of Mice and Men unit, or in a unit that focuses on descriptive writing, this lesson prompts young authors to impersonate John Steinbeck's writing style in the opening passages of the novel. A Six Trait writing activity guides them through the process of mimicking the sentence structure, all the way into writing their own descriptive essay about a place they know. The lesson provides models and rough draft guidelines.
Your class can learn about Amelia Earhart and practice important comprehension skills here. Learners answer questions about cause and effect, compare texts, and discuss similes and metaphors after reading Amelia Earhart: Free in the Skies by Robert Burleigh.
Here is a 46-slide presentation whose focus is on ways to describe characters in stories, how to create story characters, and how to show a character's personality in a student-created story. The colorful and engaging slides give lots and lots of great ideas for characterization. An excellent PowerPoint!
Every good novel needs a solid beginning! Setting the stage can have your budding authors stumped, so use this lesson to get them thinking. After examining the plot rollercoaster image (included) they consider the four places their story could start: beginning, inciting incident, middle, and end. A fun aspect to this lesson is having groups secretly write beginnings to a familiar story from one of these four points. After reading them aloud, the class guesses which beginning they wrote. Writers complete a worksheet applying these ideas to their own novels.
It's all about using peer resources in this writing process lesson, which includes a fantastic novel revision worksheet packet. Learners have read a partner's story draft the night before, and groups have a "lightning round of praise" giving compliments about the novel they read. Then, writers let their inner editors out by first coming up with goals for their finished piece. By working through the packet, they come up with stylistic and content-related revisions, leaving the grammar edits for later. Finally, release the eager editors upon their drafts to revise, revise, revise!
Use visual aids and live performances to help connect ancient myths to human emotions.
Roald Dahl's suspenseful story "The Landlady" is the focus of this superb resource for teaching foreshadowing. A captivating introduction to foreshadowing that includes looking for actual shadows will lasso your kinesthetic and visual learners. Readers take action on the second class reading of the text, hunting for clues about the outcome, which they know from the previous class session. A tidy reproducible t-chart for recording clues comes with a key.
As your class finishes the novel Dragonwings, use these culminating projects. A vocabulary list is given for chapters eleven and twelve and either an epitaph or letter activity concludes the book. The final project consists of creating a newspaper in groups that includes researched information about the historical time period, letters to the editor, and political cartoons. Utilize many of your learners' talents by assigning these projects.
Students research the social context of Elizabethan England for Shakespeare's "Hamlet". They identify cultural influences on the play focusing on the theme of revenge and then analyze and compare film interpretations of the play.
Young scholars read texts, view film and video and conduct research in an analysis and comparison of Shakespeare's "Hamlet" and the Kabuki piece "Chushingura". They focus their analysis on the theme of revenge.
Bring social studies to life! This interdisciplinary lesson has young writers tell the story of the migration of diverse groups of people to the United States. Pupils view the work of selected choreographers and discuss how dance often tells a story. A research component allows them to collect data on select populations to inspire written stories and creative dances.
Fifth graders discuss what narrative writing represents. In this language arts lesson, 5th graders review the ten strategies for engaging reader. Students listen to and read good examples of each strategyand write engaging beginnings in future narrative writings.
Discuss how media influences teen sexuality by explaining the importance of values learned from family, religion and society. Learners will role play given scenarios and write a reflection after the lesson.
Facilitate film analysis of The Joy Luck Club with these questions. As viewers watch the 1993 version by Wayne Wang of Amy Tan's classic novel, they explore key concepts specific to the film. Questions include description and higher-order thinking skills as well as crossover with history and other novels.
Exploring character traits is a fascinating process. First, read Song of the Trees, by Mildred Taylor, and then utilize technology to determine the character traits of the main characters from the story. The Microsoft Word files needed to complete the instructional activity are embedded in the plan. These files take small groups through the process of creating a cause and effect map for each character.

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