Food, Family, and Celebration Teacher Resources

Find Food, Family, and Celebration educational ideas and activities

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Art often captures an event or emotion from a specific time and place in history. Explore Painting of Bear and Sun Dances with your class to study how dance and celebrations were important aspects of Native American life. After discussing the piece and its cultural significance, learners paint and draw to create an image of celebration from their lives. These images are used to create a classroom gallery, where each piece can be discussed and shared.
Children's Day is a beloved Japanese holiday with many colorful and engaging traditions. On this national holiday celebrated yearly on May 5, children are honored for their strengths and given good wishes for happiness. Your younger elementary class will enjoy making origami flowers and paper samurai helmets as well as singing a traditional Japanese song and hearing Japanese folktales. This mini-immersion resource has picture vocabulary, background information, learning goals, focus activity ideas, and more helpful resources for teachers. 
Welcome spring as you explore various traditions for celebrating May Day.
Discover how other countries remember their fight for independence and how their celebrations compare to typical American-style revelries
Incorporating research and project-based learning while celebrating Native American Heritage Month.
Celebrate Read Across America Day with Dr. Seuss lesson plans, and dish up the "Green Eggs and Ham."
Celebrating Groundhog Day in your classroom is a fun-filled way to explore science, art, and literature.
Learn how your school can join numerous conservation organizations in celebrating Endangered Species Day on May 17th.
Using everything they have learned about writing paragraphs over the past few lessons of the unit, class members compose an informative paragraph independently. This is an authentic assessment of their ability, since learners have already practiced writing a similar paragraph with teacher guidance. After they complete this task, allow some time for celebration! Class members can share the final drafts of their projects (bookmarks about the librarians they studied) with the class and other guests you invite to the classroom. Provide structure forpositive feedback. This is part of a larger unit; check out the other lessons to understand the build-up to this final assessment.
Tour the town with this ELD lesson, which involves three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Chinatown," "A Trip to the Firehouse," "Big Bushy Mustache," and "Jamaica Louise James"). Learners practice their future tense and prepositions, as well as literary skills such as making judgments and inferences. Help your young readers blossom with the three differentiated levels within this lesson.
Each literary skill is linked to a part of speech in this ELD lesson plan, which works with three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("The Grizzly Bear Family Book, The Golden Lion Tamarin Comes Home," and "My Side of the Mountain"). Learners practice making generalizations with adverbs, noting details with prepositions, and drawing conclusions with pronouns. The sentence frames and vocabulary lists are differentiated into Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced skill levels.
Help your 4th graders find their heroes in this ELD instructional activity. Using three stories from Houghton-Mifflin ("Happy Birthday, Dr. King!" "Gloria Estefan," and "Lou Gehrig: The Luckiest Man"), they will analyze the traits of a hero and relate these true stories to their own lives. They can also practice expressing cause and effect, making judgments, and stating fact versus opinion. The instructional activity is differentiated into Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced levels for developing learners.
From the Titanic to the Iditarod, your ELD pupils will be on a whirlwind adventure with these four Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Akiak," "Grandfather's Journey," "Finding the Titanic," and "By the Shore of Silver Lake"). By practicing their conventions and vocabulary in differentiated sentence frames, they can also reinforce their literacy skills, such as expressing the author's viewpoint and finding the main idea.
What happens during a natural disaster? Science and language arts come together in this resource, which works from three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Earthquake Terror,"  "Eye of the Storm: Chasing Storms with Warren Faidley," and "Volcanoes"). ELD pupils will benefit from the differentiated vocabulary lists and sentence frames. The stories and provided questions help them practice sequencing events, expressing fact and opinion, and comparing and contrasting details.
Ice skating, music, hiking, and astronauts - what do they have in common? The four Houghton-Mifflin stories featured in this lesson ("Michelle Kwan," "La Bamba," "The Fear Place," and "Mae Jemison") show pupils that in order to be successful, you have to "give it all you've got!" The lesson details ways to practice listening and speaking ELD standards, as well as reading and writing ELD standards. The lesson is differentiated for three skill levels.
Your fifth-grade ELD pupils will easily be able to tell the difference between fact and opinion. Using three stories from Houghton-Mifflin ("And Then What Happened, Paul Revere," "Katie's Trunk," and "James Forten"), they practice their auxiliary verbs and possessive pronouns to express their opinions about story elements, as well as identify facts. The lesson also contains differentiated levels for Intermediate and Advanced learners.
Take a calming walk through nature in this ELD lesson. With three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Henry and Mudge and the Starry Night," "Exploring Parks with Ranger Dockett," "Around the Pond"), readers compare and contrast details, as well as separate fact from opinion. Differentiated instruction between Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced levels provides increasingly challenging reading and writing ELD standards.
Differentiated into Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced levels, this ELD plan accesses many different literary skills. Three stories from Houghton-Mifflin ("I Am Six," "Ten Dogs in the Window," and "Charles Tiger") give learners a way to practice their listening and speaking skills, as well as their basic reading and writing standards. The cute animals in the stories will appeal to even your most reluctant readers.
Predict what comes next in these three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("Seasons," "Pearl's First Prize Plant," and "Hilda Hen's Scary Night"). ELD pupils can practice their summary and prediction skills, as well as their auxiliary verbs and future tense. Vivid color words and exciting verbs greet your new readers with every turn of the page.
Animal friends and families help your 1st graders with their ELD and literacy skills in three Houghton-Mifflin stories ("The Secret Code," Bud's Day Out," and "An Egg Is An Egg, or, Who's in a Family?"). They can practice drawing conclusions, comparing and contrasting, and sequencing events in the stories. Additionally, vocabulary lists and sentence frames with grammar prompts are differentiated into three different skill levels.

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Food, Family, and Celebration