Fossil Fuels Teacher Resources

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Incorporate fossil fuel issues into your curriculum with these lesson plan ideas.
Humans are quickly depleting Earth's fossil fuels and locating them is becoming increasingly difficult! Layered muffins are used for models as young geologists take core samples in order to determine the presence of oil. Consider first teaching about the carbon cycle and fossil fuels to give youngsters the background knowledge that will make this activity more meaningful. Be aware that significant preparation time is required as the teacher must bake the special muffins for the activity, but it will be well worth the time!
Young scholars explore energy by researching fuel usage on Earth. In this fossil fuel lesson, students define fossil fuels, the energy created by burning them, and the impact on the environment when using them. Young scholars conduct pollution experiments by mining for cookies, using candles, and creating a mock oil spill.
Junior geologists work through three mini-lessons that familiarize them with the formation and location of fossil fuels. Part one involves reading about petroleum and where it comes from via a thorough set of handouts. A lab activity follows in part two, in which investigators experiment with the sedimentation of different sized particles. In part three, they will examine maps of the distribution of oil deposits throughout the New York region. Use any one or all three terrific activities as part of your earth science curriculum.
Students examine the relationship between energy and the environment. In groups, they participate in experiments to discover the law of thermodynamics and the differences between potential, kinetic and mechanical forms of energy. They examine the different types of fossil fuels and determine which alternatives would be best for the environment.
Students identify the different sources of fossil fuels. In this environmental science lesson plan, students research about how these impact our environment. They explore renewable energy sources that could replace fossil fuels.
Future scientists are introduced to the chemical consequences of burning fossil fuels, learning that fossil fuel combustion leads to the formation of oxides of three nonmetals: carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, all of which end up in the atmosphere and water. They explore how when each of these oxides are added to water, an acid forms, in addition to threatning wildlife in our streams, lakes, and rivers, acids react with building materials as carbonate containing rocks and some metals.
Chemistry and earth science meet in a lesson on carbon dioxide emissions. After reading about atmospheric problems caused by using fossil fuels, science stars balance equations for the burning of different alkanes. They compute the number of moles of gasses emitted and consider the use of photovoltaics and other clean energy sources. Although it is only a paper and pencil assignment, it is well-written and pertinent when you want to open your chemists' eyes to the threat of climate change.
Students calculate stoichiometrically the amount of carbon dioxide that would be emitted from burning a mole of varios alkanes that comprise fossile fuels. If the energy released from burning a mole of these alkanes is known, then the amount of carbon dioxide emitted per unit of energy produced can be determined.
Students become aware of their dependence on fossil fuels. As an introduction activity not all students are treated equitably to emphasize that fossil fuels are finite resources. They are asked to list the external sources of energy used to address everyday needs in their lives.
Here is a good visual for demonstrating the nonrenewable quality of fossil fuels and our dependence on them: pass around an opaque bag of candy, allowing pupils to take as much as they want. You will have prepared the bag to not have enough candy for everyone. Learners compare how much each individual received. Then they relate the activity to the use of fossil fuels, considering their daily activities and the amount of energy that they consume. Use this activity as an anticipatory set when introducing energy use to your class.
In this oil, fossil fuels and Earth's atmosphere activity, learners answer 3 questions about the origin of oil and its uses, the effects of burning oil and fossil fuels on the Earth's atmosphere and the origin and maintenance of the Earth's atmosphere.
As the title suggests, this is a simply summary of fossil fuels. There are no questions to answer or problems to solve, just notes about fossil fuels. The notes cover how fossil fuels are formed, how we extract it, what humans use it for, and what is produced as a waste product. Keep this for your own use as a guide to your lecture on fossil fuels.
Students discuss the relationship between the burning of fossil fuels and transportation. Various methods are used to reinforce this lesson plan.
Student is introduced to the concept of energy as a common factor among all things. They list three fossil fuels and describe how fossil fuels were formed. They then tell how much plant debris it took to form one foot of coal.
In these energy worksheets, learners learn about fossil fuels and the power stations that use the fuels. Students complete a 14 page packet about fossil fuels and power stations.
Fourth graders brainstorm the differences between the fossil fuels that people use in their transportation now and what they could use to minimize greenhouse gas emissions. They use a variety of techniques from webquests to writing samples in these lessons.
Students explore the effects of a declining fossil fuel system would have on the world. They read the line graph and other information to answer questions about fossil fuels. Students use mathematics to analyze graphical data and explore the Cartesian plane.
Students research the origin of oil and natural gas to gather an understanding of the stages of fossil fuel formation. Then the class creates murals depicting the life cycle of a fossil fuel.
Fifth graders explore the use of fossil fuels and relate it to effects on the environment.

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