French 3 Teacher Resources

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Ah, Impressionism, one of the most studied genres of art. High schoolers study the works of the major French Impressionist painters: Renoir, Monet, Degas, Gauguin, Seurat, ToulouseLautrec, Utrillo, Pissarro, Cassatt, Morisot, and Caillebotte. They create products for presentation and use reading and writing strategies in various activities.
Students explore vocabulary pertaining to food and restaurants. They read an ad for restaurants and discuss the information they expect to find. They research the Internet and locate cognates to examine the meaning in context.
How much do your learners know about Francophone countries? Invite pupils to research different countries and teach one another about the different regions though a brochure and presentation. French language learners can work together or with a partner to research a  country, put together a brochure with images and words, and present the information to the whole class. Useful materials are included.
High school historians interpret historical evidence presented in primary resources to decide if the southern advance was a reckless step toward war, or if it was reasonable. They research the Japanese southern advance tactics during the war and how the United States responded to it. They also identify how the Japanese prepared for the Pearl Harbor attack.
Where is France? Interest young learners in exploring France, French language, and French culture. They identify similarities and differences between French and American families, speak the French words for family members, analyze maps, and explore various websites. Get them started by learning vocabulayr words in context. 
Review possessive pronouns and adjectives with your intermediate and advanced French speakers. They complete four exercises to help them recall the appropriate possessives. All sentences relate to the family and family-related vocabulary. 
Close out a year of advanced placement French with a mostly self-guided research and presentation project. Individuals propose their own topics, write lengthy reports, and present their information. All of this is done in French. This assignment page includes more specific requirements and point breakdowns, as well as basic guidelines for posting work online.
Here is a wonderful presentation, perfect for setting the stage for the Revolutionary War. Containing great information and images, it acts as a timeline of events starting with the French Indian War and ending with the dawn of the American Revolution. The plan of union, Stamp Act, Boston Tea Party, Tea Act, Boston Massacre, and George Washington are described in rich detail.
Students name and locate countries of Africa and Antilles on a map. They draw the flag of each country, and explain the significance of its design. Students research one country, and one author to research. They create a time-line of France's involvement in Africa and the Antilles.
Fourth graders examine the fur trade of the 1700's. For this explorers lesson, 4th graders discuss how the French explorers traded items with the Native Americans for fur. They look at the explorer La Salle and how he influenced the fur trade. 
Students explain the purpose of cave paintings and rock art, identify some of the animals that roamed France in prehistoric times, appreciate the methods used by ancient civilization to create cave and rock art, and use appropriate French words related to cave exploration.
Students participate in a instructional activity that focuses on the mastery of French. The instructional activity targets advanced French students. They complete a variety of activities while viewing a foreign film.
Students research and write a report about a French-speaking country and present their research to classmates. They create a persuasive advertising brochure promoting one specific country as the best tourist destination.
Fifth graders create a map of the battles that occurred during The French and Indian War. In this history lesson plan, 5th graders read about the war in their text books, then divide into groups to create a detailed map of a famous battle in the war. A good, high-interest lesson.
What was French life like in the later years of World War I? With this as your guiding question, International Baccalaureate classes will study the 10 French posters and answer a variety of questions (in French). Although not all of the links posted work correctly, the questions are accessible. Advanced placement classes could also complete this assignment. 
La Belle et la Bête! Read the original fairy tale with your Francophones and watch a brief clip from the 1940s film version. As an extension, have learners work in small groups or individually to create a comic book representation of the major events. Create a rubric so learners know exactly what criteria they'll be graded on.
Allo? Qui est-ce? Hone the listening skills of your Francophiles by simulating telephone conversations. After reviewing basic french telephone expressions (some are included here), they conduct two conversations per day for one week. A rubric is included for learners to assess themselves. 
Build vocabulary, fluency and confidence in your French speakers by having them participate in some of these engaging activities. Several suggestions are given, but you will have to design the actual lesson yourself.
Starting with a quote by Charles Dickens from A Tale of Two Cities, the slides featured in this presentation go into thorough detail about the French Revolution. It includes portraits of key historical figures, maps, and demographic details about pre-revolutionary France. Images of revolutionary figures are also displayed. 
Students, after researching the routes of the early French explorers, visit the Museum of Fort LeBoeuf, which leads to the Louisiana Purchase (American/French accounts) and its differences in historical perspectives. In addition, they watch a French video Les Voyageurs.

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French 3