French Pronunciation Teacher Resources

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Students engage in an activity that exposes them to the process of learning a foreign language. The cognitive steps a learner goes through is taught. The basic word forms of the language are discussed.
This teacher guide provides several ideas for how to structure a unit on the futur simple. Start by having your class read the short passage provided about  Google. As they read, pupils should categorize verbs by type to highlight verbs used in the future tense. While a few different activities are suggested, consider using the fortune-teller to engage your class. It's simple: pair kids up; one acts as the fortune-teller, and one acts as the client. Obviously both the questions and the answers will be in the future tense!
Healthcare varies from one country to the next. Introduce your high schoolers to the healthcare system in France and some of the vocabulary words used to describe one's health. There are several activities detailed in these pages. You could play "Simon Says" with your class, practice the dialogue provided, or create voodoo-like dolls to practice identifying the correct illness according to location. Since sewing an actual voodoo doll is probably not a possibility (as the lesson suggests), use paper forms instead. 
Students demonstrate their understanding of French text by correctly filling in a chart, and by responding to questions. They demonstrate an understanding of French adjectives by using appropriate written forms of adjectives when describing a partner's handwriting.
Learners read short stories and legends from the Contes et legendes du monde francophone reader. They read the story on the Internet and follow the links to information on Gabon . They relate the stories in their own words in French and act out the stories to show comprehension of the differences between them.
Students identify produces found in France and they mention the location for the origin of each particular product. This is a platform for them to review the geography of France.
Students learn about French and Canadian Christmas traditions and compare and contrast them to American traditions. They use English-French glossaries and dictionaries. Students learn to pronounce words from the related vocabulary list and use them in sentences.
Students in a French class examine the customs related to eating food. In groups, they use the internet to visit a variety of websites to discover how to properly eat cheese, how it is made and what role it plays in meals. they also participate in a cheese tasting of their own.
In this French learning exercise, students will read 8 questions. Students will respond to each multiple choice questions the best completes the answer.
After discussing the French Revolution, the narrator addresses the slave rebellion in Saint-Domingue in August 1791. He details the political and economic connections between the citizen revolution in France and the slave revolution in modern-day Haiti, including the (unsuccessful) revolt and execution of Vincent Oge in February 1791. Rights of men of color and men of mixed-race is discussed at length as the narrator puts the race relations in context of history.
This units gives learners opportunities to * Research the history and patterns of French settlement in Louisiana * Discover three types of music (New Orleans jazz, Cajun, Zydeco) which are representative of the Francophone presence in Louisiana. * Make connections between the rhythms of the music and those of the French language.
Here's a very well organized lesson plan on learning the terminology of ballet. Learn the names of some basic positions, and how to perform them. Learn the names, which happen to be in French, of basic movements in ballet. Not only are the words introduced, but so is how to actually do the movement or pose that the term refers to. Make sure to review how to pronounce the words correctly before saying them to the class.
Follow the development of the English language from its Anglo-Saxon roots. Various Germanic, Roman, and French words helped form our English vocabulary and are incorporated into this quiz. See how well you know the beginnings of English words with 10 multiple-choice questions.
Twelfth graders in an ESOL class discover where to place the stress in multi-syllable words. Through drill and practice sessions they identify a variety of stress patterns for words containing multi-syllables. In pairs, 12th graders pattern their responses after teacher demonstrations of correct stress and pronunciation.
First graders speak French and explore how to ask and tell the time of day.
Seventh graders engage in the study of the French language in order to learn the words needed to play "Go Fish". They use cooperative learning in small groups to practice the words while being engaged in the playing of the card game.
Eleventh graders read short texts about the meaning of African and French names and how babies are named in France and Africa. They create and present a skit in which the parents and grandparents of a newborn baby choose a name.
Rather than simply summarizing the events that led to the American Revolution, have your learners listen as John Green offers some interesting points to be used as discussion or writing prompts in your review of the war. Green details early American colonies as self-governing entities, brings to light some hypocrisies of the War for Independence, and concludes by discussing the influence of the Enlightenment.
Warm up your class at the start of the year by checking their ability to read and unpack dictionary entries. This instructional activity asks pupils to pick apart a sentence that uses some pretty advanced vocabulary by using three dictionary definitions that include pronunciation, part of speech, synonyms, and more. Learners respond to ten questions about the words and use their own vocabulary to describe at least two of the words.
I live in the United States, and I am American. Where do you live? Teach your beginning French speakers how to politely inquire where another is from. Twenty-five countries are introduced (like the United States, France, Italy, Spain, etc.), and the final slide offeres a quick practice opportunity. Can your class remember the correct French pronunciation for each country shown?

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French Pronunciation