French Pronunciation Teacher Resources

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Explore caves with your class! Your scholars will participate in scientific observation, research, inference and deduction, reading, vocabulary, and writing activities about caves with this lesson plan. This resource contains five reading sections and after each one, learners participate in follow-up activities designed to reinforce the knowledge they gained from the reading. 
Students examine the purposes of language and consider a new language developed for a video game. They research world languages and create pages for a class book on languages, and write reflective essays examining their own relationship with language.
Students review the vocabulary relevant to understanding court proceedings and discover the process for selecting members of a jury. They participate in a scripted, mock jury selection and review the various types of objections.
Secondary learners will study reduction principles in order to apply them to sentence structure. By going over phrases, clauses, adverbs, and adjectives, students learn and apply the concepts. Also included is an independent practice exercise and answer key. Tip: Break this into two days if time is limited.
First graders explore Aztec culture to gain understanding of relationship between music, recreation, and culture. Seven lessons on one page.
Learn about the diversity of the culture of Lebanon through this series of cross-curricular lessons. Compare and contrast various cultures through activities and readings. An introduction to the culture of Lebanon is included along with explanations of food, religion, and recreation. Learners will be able to compare their own culture to that of an Arab culture.
Eleventh graders brainstorm controversial themes of Spanish-speaking countries. They read articles written in Spanish. They discuss the articles, practicing their Spanish speaking skills. Students conduct research and design a presentation about one of the themes from above.
Is there anything better than chocolate? This series of cross-curricular lessons lays out five to seven days of a study on chocolate. Over these days, learners watch video clips about how chocolate is made, compose poems and legends, complete a map and timeline of the history of chocolate, and interact directly with chocolate. Complete with short informational texts, options for evaluation, and extensions, this unit could be used as is or altered to suit your classroom needs.
Students are introduced to the idea of traditional oral narratives and divide them into genres. They explore the genres of context, motifs and variants. Each student finds oral narratives in their own lives and practice retelling them in their own words.
Students analyze and practice presenting vocabulary words in out of the ordinary ways with word play, frisky words and puns. They also identify the correct definition of each word and then use them in gimmicks to add flair and fun to the learning of new vocabulary words.
Eleventh graders, after investigating and studying self, family, friends, etc. by taking pictures of their daily life, assess basic photography skills that reflect aspects of their culture. They review those aspects and write a self-descriptive narration of their work.
A thorough and well-designed resource for older students, this lesson plan focuses on Chaucer's character the Wife of Bath from his classic novel, The Canterbury Tales. As a way of understanding Chaucer's complex characterization and rhetoric, this resource incorporates primary source documents about women and marriage in an attempt to explore the essential question, "Is the Wife of Bath the object of satire, the instrument of its delivery, or perhaps a combination of both?"
Young scholars examine the process of jury selection. They practice using new vocabulary related to the process and court proceedings. They explain each type of motion used in a court proceeding as well.
Students begin reading the graphic novel "Maus". Using the Internet, they discover fundamental differences between Judaism and Christianity. Using excerpts from the novel, they identify animal metaphors used for nationalities and ethnic groups. They state facts and discuss situations in the novel.
Fifth graders, while studying about the solar system in science, read Dona Luna in their Spanish class and reflect on its meaning, plot and characters. In addition, they focus in on the ending of the story when the moon breaks into pieces and in support of Science, discuss what happens when the pieces of the moon get bigger and smaller.
Students debate the pros and cons of bilingualism in the United States and in the classroom. Students investigate how language reflects and influences culture, and focus on how to make language acquisition easier for students.
Identify common prefixes and suffixes used in the English language and categorize the different kinds of information provided in a dictionary entry. Learners will write at least five pieces of information that they learn about a word from the dictionary. In addition, they will use prefix and suffix cards to create words.
First, read a document that relates factual data regarding a family trip to Costa Rica. Then read the same information in a piece where the author conveys a negative tone; finally, read one where the author establishes a positive tone. After analyzing the author's use of diction, learners are presented with neutral data regarding a fictional family celebration on a Fourth of July that they can convey in positive or negative ways. Excellent active practice with diction and connotation.
Students research the Cree tribe of North America. In this Native American activity, students will research on-line, then compare and contrast the differences between the Cree tribe and other Native American tribes. Students will break into groups of 4, with each member having a specific role.
Students read the novel Night by Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel and complete related activities. In this novel analysis lesson, students prompt write and discuss the answers. Students take notes on stereotypes and scapegoats and read how they relate to the Holocaust by visiting the given links. Students may choose from and complete a variety of extension activities.

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French Pronunciation