French Pronunciation Teacher Resources

Find French Pronunciation educational ideas and activities

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In this online interactive geography quiz worksheet, students examine the chart that includes the names of 20 physical features located throughout the world. Students identify the names of the countries where the features are located in 3 minutes, 30 seconds.
A thorough and well-designed resource for older young scholars, this activity focuses on Chaucer's character the Wife of Bath from his classic novel, The Canterbury Tales. As a way of understanding Chaucer's complex characterization and rhetoric, this resource incorporates primary source documents about women and marriage in an attempt to explore the essential question, "Is the Wife of Bath the object of satire, the instrument of its delivery, or perhaps a combination of both?"
Students examine the process of jury selection. They practice using new vocabulary related to the process and court proceedings. They explain each type of motion used in a court proceeding as well.
Learners begin reading the graphic novel "Maus". Using the Internet, they discover fundamental differences between Judaism and Christianity. Using excerpts from the novel, they identify animal metaphors used for nationalities and ethnic groups. They state facts and discuss situations in the novel.
Fifth graders, while studying about the solar system in science, read Dona Luna in their Spanish class and reflect on its meaning, plot and characters. In addition, they focus in on the ending of the story when the moon breaks into pieces and in support of Science, discuss what happens when the pieces of the moon get bigger and smaller.
Students debate the pros and cons of bilingualism in the United States and in the classroom. Students investigate how language reflects and influences culture, and focus on how to make language acquisition easier for students.
Identify common prefixes and suffixes used in the English language and categorize the different kinds of information provided in a dictionary entry. Learners will write at least five pieces of information that they learn about a word from the dictionary. In addition, they will use prefix and suffix cards to create words.
First, read a document that relates factual data regarding a family trip to Costa Rica. Then read the same information in a piece where the author conveys a negative tone; finally, read one where the author establishes a positive tone. After analyzing the author's use of diction, learners are presented with neutral data regarding a fictional family celebration on a Fourth of July that they can convey in positive or negative ways. Excellent active practice with diction and connotation.
Students research the Cree tribe of North America. In this Native American lesson, students will research on-line, then compare and contrast the differences between the Cree tribe and other Native American tribes. Students will break into groups of 4, with each member having a specific role.
Learners read the novel Night by Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel and complete related activities. In this novel analysis lesson, students prompt write and discuss the answers. Learners take notes on stereotypes and scapegoats and read how they relate to the Holocaust by visiting the given links. Students may choose from and complete a variety of extension activities.
Students explore jury selection. In this jury selection instructional activity, students brainstorm questions they would ask jurors. Students examine courtroom voacbulary and role play the different types of motions.
In this online interactive reading comprehension worksheet, students respond to 12 multiple choice questions about Hugo's Les MiserablesStudents may submit their answers to be scored.
Twelfth graders compare and contrast their culture to another culture. Through class discussions, and internet research, learners explore charitable organizations, their services and the impact the organization has had on society. They simulate a family situation and how these organizations can assist the family in solving their problem. Individually, 12th graders complete a writing assignment explaining their findings.
Students explore issues surrounding language norms, including the distinction between prescriptive and descriptive norms, the differences between norms for spoken English and those for written English, how word meanings change, and whether e-mail and instant messaging are influencing written language.
Ninth graders will review vocabulary related to school subjects in Italy. They will examine new subjects specific to Italian high schools and explore the Italian high school system and culture. Then they compare and contrast this system to a traditional American one. Vocabulary handouts and worksheets included.
Students identify Spanish words used in English, study the definitions of these words, and develop an understanding about the inclusion of words from foreign languages into spoken and written English.
Fourth graders research a person who made a difference in New York's history, they write short biographies, and then they become the person during The Living History Museum. They can choose a person from any timie period.
Experience movement in literature. High schoolers are introduced to new vocabulary related to drama and theatre. In groups, they use a piece of literature and develop their own skit to act out in front of the class. As a class, they are taught the technique of blocking and are directed by their teacher in another skit.
Students read, understand, and enjoy Les Miserables. They improve their skills in literary analysis, writing, and listening. Through the study of biblical and historical allusions, symbols, metaphors, and other figurative language, they trace theme of salvation.
Students examine the Caribbean in terms of its music, art, and folklore. As a class, they listen to a folktale and discuss the difference between telling a story and reading a story. In groups, they write their own folktale and share it with the class. They use the internet to research what it was like to grow up in Cuba during the 1970s. To end the lesson, they view examples of artwork and reflect on them in their journals.

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French Pronunciation