Geometric Proof Teacher Resources

Find Geometric Proof educational ideas and activities

Showing 1 - 20 of 77 resources
Learners examine their prior knowledge of algebra to explore geometric proof. In this proving supplementary and complementary lesson, students prove a solution to an equation using algebraic properties. Learners then write their own statements to prove their logic. Students then complete a series of geometric proof problems.
In this geometry instructional activity, students take the derivative of functions. They prove theorems using geometric proofs. There are 13 questions.
This visual, manipulative-based format for teaching geometric proofs nicely scafolds learners' development of mathematical reasoning and proof skills. This sample represents a proof of the congruence of vertical angles in four formats; visually using manipulatives, paragraph, two column, and proof blocks. 
Your young designers use geometric concepts and isosceles triangle properties to create a blue print for a pennant with specific criteria. Second, they write a geometric proof outlining the correlation between base angle measures and the side measures of their pennant. Finally, follow-up questions guide your pennant designers in a discussion about the geometry used in this math task.
Young scholars examine Triangle Congruency. In this measurement comparison instructional activity, students use inductive, deductive and analytical thinking skills to prove triangle congruency. Young scholars analyze and record their findings on activity worksheets.
Students engage in a instructional activity that is about the classification of triangles and the mathematical proofs involved in working with them. They work on a variety of problems that are created by the teacher with the focus upon the importance of classifying the triangles.
Students practice writing formal two column geometric proofs involving congruent triangles and congruent corresponding parts.
Students explore geometric proofs. In this math lesson, students prove the solution to an equation while using algebraic properties. Students write their own statements to be proven.
Tenth graders complete a unit of lessons on congruent triangles and triangle proofs. They observe and participate in teacher-led discussions of examples of the methods to prove that triangles are congruent, and create an original proof.
Tenth graders investigate angles and arcs in circles.  In this geometry lesson, 10th graders explore the relationship between the intersecting chords of a circle and the intercepted arcs.  The lesson makes use of a dynamic geometry utility and includes several problems that apply the theorem and a 2-column formal proof of the theorem.
High schoolers research the concept of the Pythagorean Theorem. In this Pythagorean Theorem lesson, students use the Internet to learn about the Pythagorean Theorem. High schoolers construct proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem.
Twelfth graders investigate maximum and minimum as it relates to billiard and mini golf. In this calculus lesson, 12th graders review how to find the maximum and minimum and write proofs to show how they arrive at their answer. They follow the example of a geometric proof to write their calculus proof.
Pupils complete simple algebraic proofs to prepare them for more challenging geometric proofs. Class begins with a demonstration by the teacher, then students work out their own problems and share results with the class.
In this geometry worksheet, 10th graders supply the missing step or justification of a step in two column geometric proof.  The one page interactive worksheet contains five multiple choice questions and is self checking. 
In this geometric proof activity, students use geometric theorems and rules to prove given statements. They prove that given lines and angles are similar. This five-page activity contains ten problems.
In this geometric proofs activity, students prove supplementary, complimentary, and congruent angles from given models and information. This four-page activity contains six multi-step problems.
After addressing the terminology used with medians and centroids of triangles in the first part of this series, the instructor shows how to solve this type of problem. He illustrates the concepts by using a high-level problem. Consequently, it will likely reinforce comprehension of algebraic expressions.
Delving into a proof that the diagonals of a rhombus are perpendicular to each other, this lecture evaluates the angles and sides of this figure. It would serve as a great test preparation activity.
The terminology used in geometry, including such words as centroid and median are discussed in this video. Through this lecture, young mathematicians can see a visual representation both median and centroid. Also, a proof showing how to calculate medians is demonstrated.
The terminology used in geometry, including such words as centroid and median are discussed in this video. Through this lecture, young mathematicians can see a visual representation both median and centroid. Also, a proof showing how to calculate medians is demonstrated.